UTG Blister Airsoft Speedloader Review

Airsoft speedloaders reduce reloading time by pushing multiple BBs into the magazine with a single press of a button.

Operating the UTG Blister speedloader is pretty simple: First you fill the speedloader up with BBs. You then place the small cylinder shaped piece, located at the bottom of the speedloader, into where you’d normally insert the BBs into your airsoft rifle magazine. From there, you press a circular button, located near the top of the speedloader, which releases the long plastic piece that you can see coming out of the top of the loader in the picture above. Finally, you simply push the long arm piece downwards, and it will push BBs into the magazine.

The Blister speedloader holds about 115 BBs and ejects 4 BBs with every push of the arm. It actually does reduce reloading time quite substantially, oppose to manually reloading one BB at a time by hand.

It’s made entirely of plastic, but can withstand drops on soft surfaces.

The Blister speedloader comes with pistol magazine adapter. It’s just a small plastic piece that snaps onto the end of the speedloader and helps the speedloader stay flush against bulky spring pistol magazines while you pump BBs into it.

In a wrap, the UTG Blister speedloader is a vital piece of equipment for the 3-$5 it costs, especially if you play actual airsoft skirmishes. It cuts down loading time and keeps you in the game.

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How to Make a Airsoft Masterkey

Masterkeys are basically miniature shotguns that can be attached onto tactical rails on a rifle. They’re great for CQB (Close Quarter Battle) because they have a wide spray radius and can take down multiple targets at a time. However, airsoft masterkeys are expensive and usually require Green-Gas to operate. In this post you’ll learn how to make a effective airsoft masterkey that operates without gas that’s made from inexpensive, household items.

This is what you’ll need:

  • An airsoft rifle that has tactical rails, preferably with holes lining the hand-guard. For example, the Crosman Stinger R34 is a perfect gun to use.
  • A toilet paper roll
  • Spray paint (I’d recommend using a standard color [black, OD green, etc.] for tactical reasons, but you can use a more creative color if you want to be unique)
  • Bright orange duct-tape
  • A sturdy balloon (try to keep it the same color as the spray paint you’re using)
  • A flat piece of wood, about as long and a little bit skinnier than the toilet paper roll (the wood from a mousetrap is perfect)
  • 3 zip-ties
  • A red-dot sight (this is completely optional, but it just helps aiming a little bit. Plus the red-dot sight only applies if you decide to mount it on the side instead of the bottom [I’ll explain mounting options later on]. However, if you do want the red-dot sight also get a fourth zip-tie)
  • Heavy duty tape (duct-tape will do)

Step 1: Cut the neck off your balloon so that there’s a wide opening. Don’t cut it too far down, but just down of where the narrow neck begins to widen. You can discard of the cut-off neck.

Step 2: Now take your toilet paper roll and fit the balloon over one end of it. Only have about an inch of the balloon actually over the toilet paper roll, the rest of it should just be hanging off the end. Once you have gotten the balloon about 1 inch over the toilet paper roll you can then tape it down with the heavy-duty/duct-tape. Make sure to tape it down firmly and to wrap it in several layers of tape to insure that it won’t come undone.

Step 3: Take the small piece of wood and tape it onto the toilet paper roll. But, only tape it down on either end, leaving the middle open so that you’ll be able to sqeeze the zip-ties in between the wood and the toilet paper roll later on. Make sure to tape it down tight enough so that the wood and toilet paper roll won’t become separated, but not so tight that you crush the toilet paper roll and that you’ll have enough leeway to sneak the zip-ties in-between. In the side-image below I taped the wood down with black tape so that you can see where you’re suppose to put it.

Step 4: Now you can spray paint the entire thing (try not to spray paint the balloon because it won’t be as stretchable). After the paint’s dried, take the orange duct-tape and wrap it all the way around the very front of the toilet paper roll (the opposite end of where the balloon is). The orange duct-tape will serve as the orange safety tip; It’s illegal to have a device that fires projectiles (besides real ammunition and metal BBs, that is) without a orange tip on the muzzle at least 3/4 of an inch thick. If you decide not to put the orange tape on the muzzle of your masterkey, then you run the risk of people thinking it’s a real firearm and can even get you in trouble with the police.

Step 5: Now take the zip-ties and squeeze them in between the piece of wood and the toilet paper roll. Since it’s made of cardboard, the toilet paper roll should bend inwards a little bit when you push the zip-ties though, giving you enough room to sneak them through. If you’re having a hard time, loosen the tape that’s holding it down. Make sure to space the three zip-ties at small intervals (one on near the end of the masterkey, one in the middle and one near the front). Don’t pull the zip-ties completely though. Pull/push them through just enough so that you have slack to go around the piece of wood, through one of the holes in the gun, out another hole in the gun, and back to the end of the zip-tie where you can pull it tight.

If you’re confused on what you’re suppose to be doing with the zip-tie then think of it this way: You’re basically tying the piece of wood to the gun, securing the masterkey. In the illustration below, the black part represents the zip-tie, the blue part is the hand-guard of the gun, the red parts are the holes on the hand-guard that the zip-tie goes through, the green part is the piece of wood, and finally the purple part is the actual masterkey which is obviously attached to the piece of wood:

So all you’re doing is completing that black loop with zip-ties in three different places.

If you’ve done it correctly, then it should look something like this:

As you can see, the black zip-ties go in-between the piece of wood, through a hole on the top of the hand-guard, out a hole in the bottom of the hand-guard, and finally connects back up with the other end of the zip-tie. You can then pull the zip-tie tight and cut off the excess.

It’s recommended that you mount the masterkey on the side of the gun instead of on the bottom rail; Mounting on the side allows you to pull the balloon back further when you’re firing, creating higher velocities, and it also allows you the option of attaching a sight onto it, if you’d like. The only downside is that it’s higher profile mounted on the side, and can sometimes bump into things and break.

How the masterkey works is, when you’re ready to fire, to pour 5-10 BBs directly in to the muzzle of the masterkey and let them trickle into the balloon. You then grasp the BBs from the outside of the balloon, holding them firmly in-between the balloon so that they wont fall back out the muzzle. You then  pull the balloon backwards and let it go to fire. The balloon will launch the BBs forward at about 200 FPS and has a effective range of 10-15ft.

And it’s very simple to attach a red-dot scope onto the masterkey if you want to. All you do is run a fourth zip-tie between the wood and the toilet paper roll (just like you did to mount it), except instead of going into the gun you run it over a red-dot sight and then tighten it down, keeping the sight firmly in place. The sight honestly doesn’t help too much, but it at least gives you a general idea of where you’re shooting at and it also has to “cool” factor.

Please give all credit from this project to SirBuffaloSushi and Airsofter United.

DBoys M4/M16 Airsoft 500rd Extended Magazine Review

The DBoys 500-round Extended Magazine fits onto most M4 and M16 airsoft AEGs. It’s an upgrade from the average 300-round magazines that come with the average M4/M16 AEG, giving you a 66% (or 200 BB) increase in BB capacity.

The DBoys Extended Magazine works just like any other AEG magazine. You load the BBs into a little plastic sliding door on the top of the magazine, filling up a large chamber. You then slide the little door shut and insert the magazine into your gun. From there you wind a wheel on the bottom of magazine (you can see the wheel in the picture above, at the bottom of the magazine, in the bottom right corner) until it gets hard to turn and starts to make a distinct clicking noise.

Having 500 rounds is great because you can just keep shooting without having to reload. However, about half way through the magazine, BBs will stop feeding and your gun will start to dry-fire. When this happens you need to wind the wheel on the bottom back up again. It’s not a huge deal, but it can be a chore if you’re in a actual airsoft skirmish and you have to stop to wind your magazine back up, especially when the whole point of a extended mag is to not have to stop to reload.

The DBoys Extended Magazine also claims to work with M4s and M16s from JG, AGM, DBoys, Classic Army and Echo 1, but that’s not entirely true. With my personal JG M4 2010 Upgraded Version I have to wiggle the magazine back and forth to get it to slide into my receiver and then forcefully slam the bottom of the magazine with the palm of my hand to get it to click into place (kind of like what your avatar does on Call of Duty: Black Ops when you close the top of the M60 after reloading it). The problem is that the magazine doesn’t go with the slight turn that M4 receivers have, making the back of the magazine scrape up against the M4’s receiver. Although slamming the bottom of the magazine does make it click into place and allows it to work normally, it makes reloading much slower and also causes some cosmetic damage to the magazine as well as inside receiver.

The magazine is very durable, however. It’s made completely of metal, excluding the wheel on the bottom, the plastic door on the top and a couple other little pieces. Even after upwards of 20 times of slamming it into my M4 it still works fine.

The last thing worth noting is that the little plastic sliding door that keeps the BBs from falling out of the storage chamber is very loose. This means that if you tip the magazine forward, unless it’s already inserted into your gun, the door will slide open, letting BBs fall all over the ground. Therefore, keeping spare magazines outside the gun (in a vest, backpack, etc.) is not a good idea without taping over the door first. However, this isn’t a huge problem because, being an already extended magazine, you may not need a spare.

In a wrap, the DBoys Extended Magazine is great for extended shooting. Even though you have to stop about half way through the magazine to re-wind it, it still beats having to carry a whole other magazine with you. And also just keep in mind that you might have to put some effort into getting the magazine into your gun.

Also note that this attachment is for AEGs (Automatic Electric Guns) only. It won’t work with spring rifles.

Tapco Intrafuse T6 Rubber Butt-Pad Review

The Tapco T6 Butt-Pad attaches to the butt of most M4s with adjustable stocks, compatible with both airsoft rifles and real ones.

The T6 Butt-Pad pops right onto most M4 style rifles with adjustable/collapsible stocks without any glue, tape, or any other bonding agent. It also pops right back off very easily if you pull on it, but it’s still snug enough that it won’t fall off in the middle of shooting. To give you an example of what type of stock works best, the T6 fits perfectly onto my personal JG M4 2010 Upgraded Version as well as the Crosman Stinger R34 airsoft rifles.

The T6 definitely helps the butt of your gun to stay up on your shoulder, especially if you’re wearing a backpack or a vest where there’s a strap right where the stock rests. It also takes off some of the impact that your shoulder gets from recoil on real guns.

The T6 also adds a full inch the the length of your gun, which can be both good and bad. If you have longer arms, you might benefit from the extra length. But if you already have your stock at a perfect length, the extension might make your rifle feel awkward. Although, truthfully, an extra inch doesn’t make that big of a difference on my personal airsoft rifles, and, besides, the T6 only fits onto adjustable stocks like I’ve mentioned, so you should be able to just adjust your stock an inch inward if you really don’t like the extra length.

It’s also extremely durable. It’s made fully of rubber, and can hold up to just about any climate or terrain you can throw at it.

In a wrap, the Tapco T6 Butt-Pad is a durable and cheap attachment for any M4. It works with both airsoft and real firearms and keeps your rifle up on your shoulder. The only down-side is the extra length, which isn’t even that big of a deal.

BattleAxe M4/M16 Dual Magazine Airsoft Connector Review

The BattleAxe Dual Magazine Connector is designed to fit almost any M4 or M16 airsoft magazine, making reloading times faster and helping to conserve space.

Each of the BattleAxe Connectors (each pack comes with two of them, as you can see in the picture above) is made up of 4 pieces: a large plastic buckle in the front, a smaller plastic piece in the back, a long screw that connects the two plastic pieces and also runs in between the two magazines, and finally the olive-drab strip of fabric that holds the magazines in place.

The whole connector is cheaply made, but in particular the olive-drab straps are very thin and the ends fray very easily. Right out of the package all four of the ends weren’t properly tied, and were starting to fray. A simple solution here is to, as soon as you get the connector, take a couple pieces of duct-tape and sandwich about 1 inch of the end of the strap between it. This will help keep it from fraying and make it a little more durable.

How the connector works is each of the magazines go in between the screw that runs down the middle and the olive-drab strap on either side. You then pull the strap tight and tighten the screw in the back to give it added stability. However, some M4 and M16 magazines might be too wide to fit in between the plastic piece in the front and the plastic piece in the back. In most cases you can just loosen the screw until the two plastic pieces are far enough away from each other for the magazine to fit in between. But, in other cases, you might need to purchase a longer screw.

The last issue worth noting is that the magazines do start to slide up/down after extended use, but this is something you just have to live with because all magazine connectors are going to have the same problem, more or less.

Through all the down-sides, the BattleAxe magazine connector isn’t all bad. The reloading time is just about the same with AEGs because you still have to wind up the magazine, you can’t just pop it in and start shooting. But, it works very well for spring guns that magazines you don’t have to wind up. And it’s also great for saving space, keeping the extra magazine on the gun itself instead of having to keep it on you body.

Although, BattleAxe says that their magazine connector is just as good as any metal magazine connector, which I can’t say is true because you don’t have fraying/durability problems with the metal connectors as much as you do with this fabric and plastic one.

In closing, the BattleAxe M4/M16 Dual Magazine Airsoft Connector isn’t all bad. It certainly has some quality issues, but it’s cheaper and lighter than the metal connectors. And as long as you don’t expect too much, the BattleAxe magazine connector might be all you need.

Also note that it does not come with the two magazines. Unless whoever you’re buying from specifically says otherwise, all you get are the two connectors; you need your own two magazines to use in partnership with the connectors.

UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip

The UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is one of the more basic grips out there, although it’s sturdy and gets the job done.

One of the biggest issues you might have is mounting it. It’s designed for Picatinny rails, which are smaller than the Weaver rails that are more commonly used in airsoft. The sides which grip the rail are also fixed, so you can’t make them any larger. But, if you push hard enough, you should be able to slide it on after a little trial and error. Once you get it on you simply tighten the big knob on the bottom to keep the grip from sliding backwards and forwards.

A cool thing about the UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is that it’s ambidextrous. This means that it can be used for both right and left handed shooters.

There’s also two little plastic pieces on either side of the grip that are removable to make room for a pressure pad (flashlights, lasers, etc). To remove them, you just twist off the knob that keeps the grip from sliding backwards/forwards and they will just slide right off. And, like I said, there’s a piece on either side so that you can put the pressure pad on either side, depending on which hand you shoot with.

Another nice feature is the hidden compartment. The knob that keeps the grip in place/takes the plastic pieces off and on is really hollowed out. And there’s a little cap on the end of the knob that you can screw off to reveal the compartment. It’s mostly meant for carrying spare batteries, but you can carry anything from a folded up piece of paper to extra BBs very easily.

As far as sturdiness, the Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is very sturdy. It has no wobble at all and doesn’t budge even if you accidentally hit it against something while shooting in CQB. It’s even more sturdy if you did mount it on a Weaver rail because it fit so tight to begin with. You can even use it as a bi-pod if you’re lying down.

Using the grip does wear on you after a while. While it does make your gun more stable and therefore more accurate, it’s difficult to hold your arm out at length, with the weight of the gun on you, without wearing yourself out very quickly. Try holding your hand almost all the way out in a fist; you’ll start to feel uncomfort in under three minuets. Now try holding your hand closer to your body, right in front of wear the magazine would be, with you palm comfortably pointing upwards; you should be able to hold that stance for longer.

Although, you’re going to have that problem with any grip. Plus, the adrenalin from being in a airsoft fight (or real gun fight, if that’s what you’re planning on using it for) will give you a boost so that you won’t even feel it.

In a wrap, the UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is a very sturdy, basic grip, but gets the job done. It has a couple cool features, and is also cheap for what it’s worth. Overall, I think this is a great investment for any kind of rifle, airsoft and real.

NcSTAR Red-Dot Sight (With 4 Different Reticles) Review

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is a great multipurpose battery powered optic. With 4 different reticles, you can use it for a wide range of situations from pin-point long distant shots to Close Quarter Battle. It comes with an extra battery, a lens cover, a Allen Wrench, a small screw driver to open the battery compartment with, a cloth to clean the lens with, and a manual. It’s also available in black, camouflage, and silver.

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is really a lot smaller than it looks. It’s roughly three inches long, one and a half inches wide, and two inches tall. Its small size isn’t necessarily bad, though. Its low profile is great for CQB and also makes it lighter if you have an already heavy gun.

One of the biggest attractions is the 4 different reticles: a small crosshair, a regular dot, a circle within a circle, and another small crosshair with a circle around the center. You can easily change between them by turning a knob on the very back of the sight. Having 4 different reticles is great, like I said before, because of its versatility. If you need to make a pin-point sniper shot you can switch to the normal red-dot, but if you need to go into a building or a tight space, you can switch to the circle within a circle reticle.

There’s also 7 different brightness settings. 1 being for darker surroundings and 7 being for bright surroundings. You change the brightness by turning the big knob in the middle of the sight.

The reticle is projected onto the glass by a little window near the back of the sight. If you look at the sight backwards you can actually see a miniature version of the reticle with a light shining on it inside the little window. This means if you’re using the NcSTAR Red-Dot sight at nighttime, someone could spot you from the light inside the sight. This, however, is something you just have to live with because all red-dot sight are more or less going to have the same problem.

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight easily mounts to any standard weaver/picatinny rail by unscrewing the bolts on the side with the included Allen Wrench and then tightening them back up once you have the sight positioned on your rail.

Adjusting the sight is also very easy. There’s a bolt on the top of the sight, and one on the side. You simply turn the bolt on the top right or left to make it the reticle aim higher or lower, and turn the bolt on the side left or right to make the reticle air more left or right. But, straight out of the box, it was already deadly accurate on my personal Jing Jong M4 airsoft rifle.

The last thing worth noting is the battery. It’s a CR2023 3-volt Micro Lithium Battery and can be accessed by unscrewing the very top of the brightness-selector knob. Like I said before; it comes with a spare, but they last quite a while so you might not even need it.

To wrap things up, the NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is one of the best out there. It’s small and low profile, but still gets the job done. And it’s very customizable and can easily adapt to what you want to use it for. You really can ask much more from a red-dot sight.