UTG Blister Airsoft Speedloader Review

Airsoft speedloaders reduce reloading time by pushing multiple BBs into the magazine with a single press of a button.

Operating the UTG Blister speedloader is pretty simple: First you fill the speedloader up with BBs. You then place the small cylinder shaped piece, located at the bottom of the speedloader, into where you’d normally insert the BBs into your airsoft rifle magazine. From there, you press a circular button, located near the top of the speedloader, which releases the long plastic piece that you can see coming out of the top of the loader in the picture above. Finally, you simply push the long arm piece downwards, and it will push BBs into the magazine.

The Blister speedloader holds about 115 BBs and ejects 4 BBs with every push of the arm. It actually does reduce reloading time quite substantially, oppose to manually reloading one BB at a time by hand.

It’s made entirely of plastic, but can withstand drops on soft surfaces.

The Blister speedloader comes with pistol magazine adapter. It’s just a small plastic piece that snaps onto the end of the speedloader and helps the speedloader stay flush against bulky spring pistol magazines while you pump BBs into it.

In a wrap, the UTG Blister speedloader is a vital piece of equipment for the 3-$5 it costs, especially if you play actual airsoft skirmishes. It cuts down loading time and keeps you in the game.

Advertisements

Umarex Tactical Force Combat CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Umarex Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back) airsoft pistol. It’s mostly made of metal, with the exception of the grip, and in many ways resembles a Glock. It requires standard 12 gram CO2 cartridges to operate.

The Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back), as mentioned before, meaning that the slide jolts backwards every time you pull the trigger, just like a real gun. However, the Combat’s slide only blows-back about 3/4 of an inch, making it look and feel less realistic. It’s also a little clunky, meaning that the slide doesn’t blow back in a single, smooth motion; it’s almost feels like the slide is shuttering back and forth. This not only makes the gun feel sluggish, it makes more difficult to keep your sights on target when you’re shooting.

GBB’s are known for their ability to “shoot as fast as you can pull the trigger”, but the Tactical Force Combat can easily malfunction when being shot too fast. Often times it will dry fire and then fire two BBs on your next shot if you shoot too rapidly. This isn’t a huge deal, it just forces you to slow down and take your time, which is usually a good thing anyway. However, it’s still a hassle for the times that it’s necessary to put BBs down range at a fast pace.

The Combat also isn’t one of the more accurate pistols out there. At 15-20ft with .20 gram BBs it can hit a 12-inch Gel Trap with decent consistency. However, at ranges over 25 feet, the BB starts to sink and is very inaccurate.

The sights are both good and bad. The front sight consists of a little white rod stuck through a standard black blade front sight, giving you a sort of white-dot sight. The back sights are made of a little bent green rod that is also stuck through a standard back sight, giving you a sort of green-dot sight. The contrast of green on white dots makes aiming and acquiring targets easy and fast. However, if you looked at the sights from the side, the green and white rods stick all the way through the standard sights, popping out the other side, making them look sloppy. But this is only a cosmetic issue, and doesn’t effect performance.

The Combat boosts a impressive 400FPS (Feet Per Second) with .12 gram BBs, and averages between 350 and 380FPS with .20 gram BBs, depending on how new the CO2 cartridge is. Although .12 gram BBs have higher velocity, I’d recommend only using .20 gram BBs because they’re much more accurate.

Through all the downsides, the Combat gets extremely good shots-per-CO2. The blow-back starts wearing down after about 8-10 magazines and the slide stops being blown back far enough for the slide lock to catch, but it still shoots BBs consistently up until 14-16 magazines. This is great if you’re planning on using it in a airsoft war, minimizing downtime.

To put the CO2 cartridge into the gun you simply press a button on the bottom of the gun, directly behind the magazine, which releases the part of the grip, revealing a small compartment. From there, you fit the cartridge into the compartment and screw it in.

The magazine is just like any other GBB magazine. There’s a little metal lever on the side of the magazine that you pull down to the bottom and lock in place. Once locked in place, you pour BBs into a small hole near the bottom of the magazine and then unlock the metal piece, putting tension on the BBs. The magazine holds 15 rounds and is full metal, making it both durable and relatively high-capacity.

One of the more notable issues it the safety. Instead of simply sliding the switch back and forth, in order switch between “fire” and “safe” you must push the switch inwards and then back/forward. It’s very difficult to do this with one finger, forcing you to hold the gun in one hand while trying to manipulate the safety with the other. However, after switching between fire and safe multiple times, it starts to loosen up.

The last thing worth noting is some of the little details. On the trigger itself there’s a mock safety, it looks like a smaller trigger coming out of the normal trigger, which on a real gun you press down along with the trigger to fire; although it doesn’t do anything on this gun, and is just for show. Another cool feature is the slide lock. As soon as you’ve discharged the last round, the slide stays back, indicating you’ve run out of ammo.

In a wrap, the Tactical Force Combat pistol has a lot of issues, but also has potential. It’s great for CQB, but fails to stay consistent at long ranges. It also has a large magazine, and features very good shots-per-cartridge. The blow-back is a neat feature, but ultimately reduces accuracy. It’s really not a bad gun, but just not one of the best.

Crosman Nirto Lubricating Airsoft Oil Review

Crosman Nitro Lubricating Oil spays directly down the barrel of a airsoft gun and acts like WD40: helping decrease friction on the BB and increase velocity.

The saying “A little bit goes a long way,” is definitely applies when using Crosman Nitro Lubricant. If you spray too much then it can clog your gun and dramatically decrease BB velocity. And it’s also near impossible to remove once it’s inside the barrel, so just try to use a little bit at a time.

I personally accidentally sprayed too much into my Stinger P9, which before could hit targets from over 40 feet away with extreme accuracy, but will now only fire BBs 15 feet before they drop to the ground. I’ve tried multiple times to clean the barrel out with a cleaning rod to no effect. Like I said before, just use a little bit at a time (any more than a 2 second burst is too much).

Crosman says that for the first 100 shots after you’ve applied the Nitro Lube your gun will have decreased power and accuracy, but, in my experience, it usually takes a good 200 to 300 shots to fully regain the original power and accuracy. It’s not a huge deal, but immediately after you’ve used the Nitro Lube and cleaned out the extra residue, you should go out and stand about five feet away from your target and just unload the 200-300 shots to get your gun back to normal. This way, if the next day you want to go shoot, you can just start shooting like normal instead of having to shoot 300 breaking-in rounds.

Even after the first 200-300 shots, when you’ve regained the accuracy and power, there’s not much of a difference in velocity. In fact, if you test fired your gun before using the Nitro Lube, then test fired after you used the Nirto Lube (and fired the first 200-300 breaking-in shots), you really wouldn’t even be able to tell a difference. However, it does decrease jamming and help protect the barrel and prolong the guns overall life expectancy.

In a wrap, Crosman Nirto Lubricant won’t do much to increase velocity, but it can help protect your gun and prevent jamming. If you have a gun that’s already running well, then you might not want to risk accidentally spraying in too much lube and clogging your gun. But, for the $5 it costs, Crosman Nitro Lube can be a good investment to protect your gun in the long run or fix it if it’s prone to jamming; just don’t use too much!

20 Tips and Pointers to Greatly Improve Your Airsoft Skills

These are 20 tips and pointers to greatly improve your airsoft game. As long as you keep these tips in mind, you will see much improved accuracy, focus, and overall performance in your airsoft. But, read these tips with a grain of salt, for example, numbers 12 and 13; having a bunch of different guns gives you versatility to use different style guns in different situations. But the point 12 and 13 are making is that if you are thinking about spending a bunch of money on a bunch of different guns, maybe you should think about buying one really good gun or upgrades for a gun you already have, instead.

  1. Always use your sights. You should almost never fire from the hip, even with fully-automatic guns.
  2. Practice how you would be in a game. Wear all the equipment, clothing, and use the exact guns that you would be using in a actual airsoft match while you practice.
  3. Use the correct BB weight for each individual gun. When you first get a gun, you should test which BB weight works best for that gun (test with the three major BB weights: .12 gram, .20 gram, and .25 gram). Look for accuracy and how far the BB will go before it lands.
  4. Keep a good grip on your gun while you’re shooting. Keep the stock (if you have a stock) firmly pressed against your shoulder and your weak hand holding the gun, while your strong hand pulls the trigger.
  5. With spring pistols, keep the gun in your strong hand and cock the slide with your weak hand. (Some people do it the opposite way because it’s easier to cock with your strong hand, but it decreases accuracy)
  6. Take your time and aim. Don’t panic and start firing if you see a opponent in a airsoft match, take you time to line up your sights and make a accurate shot.
  7. Once you fire, don’t wait around to see if you hit your target. After the BB leaves the barrel, there’s nothing more you can do. Immediately re-arm (get another BB chambered) your weapon before bothering to see if you’ve hit. If you missed, fire again. If you hit, move on.
  8. Wear the appropriate clothing. If you’re hot/cold/uncomfortable you’ll start hurrying shots and sacrificing accuracy.
  9. Calm yourself before a airsoft match. If you go in angry, nervous, etc. you will make mistakes. Get in the mind set of a robot: you need to remember all of what you’ve learned while practicing and what you’ve read in this post and complete your mission.
  10. Practice makes perfect. I know I’ve mentioned practicing before, but it’s vital that you do so. The more BBs you put down range the better you’ll get.
  11. Push yourself. If you push yourself to hit a 12-inch target at 50 feet away, think about how easy it’ll be to hit a player from 20 feet. Try to find your maximum range and then practice from even farther away.
  12. Upgrade the airsoft guns you have instead of buying more of them. Investing in optics, extra magazines, and accessories will greatly improve your performance with that gun. Besides, you can only shoot one gun at a time anyway.
  13. Invest in a good quality gun. This adds to number 12, if you invest in a more expensive, better gun, it’ll pay off. AEG’s (Automatic Electronic Gun), for example, are good to invest in. They’re usually fully-automatic and one will serve you better than the two cheaper spring guns that you could have bought for the same amount of money.
  14. When retreating, don’t attempt to fire back. You should only retreat when it’s your last option and you’ve already tried everything to hold back opposing players. That said, you shouldn’t turn around to fire back if you’re already retreating. If you couldn’t hold off opposing players staying still, you’re not going to do anything randomly firing backwards as you are trying to run away. The chances of actually hitting someone is slim and trying will only slow you down and give the other team time to catch up to you.
  15. Be tactical. For example, if you’re planning to come around a corner (this especially applies for CQB game-play), take out your secondary, which is smaller and lighter than your primary, and breech the corner with that. This will allow you to bring your gun up and aim much faster than you would using your primary. As soon as you’ve cleared the corner, though, start using your primary again.
  16. Use all the tools at your disposal. If you have a airsoft grenade, don’t be afraid to use it. The same goes for if you have a flashlight, secondary, speed re-loader, or any other tool you may have. Make it as easy for yourself as you can.
  17. If cover is available use it. Unlike video games, though, visual cover might not be the greatest choice. The mandatory orange tip on the mussel of every airsoft gun pretty much makes it imposable to try to hide. If you’re laying down in visual cover and are spotted you are in some deep trouble. On the other hand, using physical cover is a good strategy. You can pop in and out of physical cover, making quick shots when you come out and then immediately going back in, gives the opposing players very little chance to hit you.
  18. When there’s a break in the action, you should immediately reload. When you do reload, make sure you’re completely maxed out. Depending on how safe you are, take time to get a BB in the chamber as well as completely reloading your magazine. Make sure to keep an eye out for enemy players and at least a couple bullets loaded into one of your weapons, while you reload the other one; you’re most vulnerable when you’re reloading.
  19. We’ve already mentioned practice multiple times before, but it’s important to maximizing your practice time. Apart from “pushing yourself”, drills are the best way to go. Practice everything: reloading, shooting while moving, shooting while lying down, coming in and out of cover, etc.. Do a drill multiple times. It will get boring and frustrating after a while but you just need to take a little break, reestablish yourself, and keep on going. Succession is key.
  20. The last tip is one of the most important and the most obvious. Take care of your guns and they will take care of you. Keep them in a safe place where they won’t be broken, lube and clean them as necessary, and (as mentioned before) give them the right ammunition.

TSD 1911 Non-Blowback CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Colt 1911 is arguably the most world-widely used handgun of all time. Everyone from the US Army to the SAS use versions of the 1911. TSD took all of the 1911’s power, accuracy, and durability and incorporated them into their 1911 airsoft pistol.

The TSD 1911 has many of the features of a real Colt 1911, including a beaver-tail grip, block iron sights, and the caliber engraved on where the shells eject on a real 1911. It’s also made of mostly of metal, with the exceptions of the grips and the orange tip. Although it does have a hammer, it isn’t a working one; it is locked into place and is solely for decoration.

Since the TSD 1911 is CO2 (a version of Green Gas) powered, you can fire it as fast as you can pull the trigger. There’s no need to cock the slide back every time you shoot, like you do with spring pistols. This makes giving covering fire in a airsoft battle very easy. But, you run out of ammo quickly, so it might be a good idea to invest in extra magazines.

The magazines them selves hold 15 rounds and are fairly easy to reload. They’re made of some type of metal and are very durable. They’re skinny though, because it has to squeeze in next to the CO2.  To reload you have to pull the magazine spring down to the bottom where it locks into place, then you just push the BBs into a hole near the bottom, just like every other airsoft pistol.

The TSD 1911 takes 12 gram CO2 cartridges that go into a chamber that is located right behind the magazine, at the very back of the grip. To take the CO2 cartridges in and out the grip slides backward so that you can access it from the side.

Shooting wise, the TSD 1911 is very accurate with .20 gram BBs. The front sight has a white dot on it so you can aim much more accurately. However, it has a extremely heavy trigger pull, so it’s a good thing if you have a steady hand. You also start losing strength and accuracy when the CO2 cartridge gets low, but that’s to be expected.

It’s non-blowback which means that the slide doesn’t slide back when you shoot. This is both good and bad, because on the one hand blow-back looks awesome and makes it much more realistic, but on the other, blow-back is a CO2 drainer and you’d run out of CO2 in half the time that you normally would. You only get to shoot six or seven full magazines before your CO2 starts running out, anyway, so it’s probably better that it doesn’t have blow-back.

The last thing that you should take note of is the velocity that it shoots. With a new CO2 cartridge the TSD 1911 fires .20 gram BBs at a mind-blowing 400 FPS. Because of this, it might be to hot for friendly backyard airsoft skirmishes. If you wear heavy jackets or airsoft protection gear, you’ll probably be okay, but you just don’t want to be wearing a simple t-shirt or to get hit in the bare skin.

To wrap things up, TSD 1911 is a great sidearm that packs a hard punch. It’s very accurate and holds its own against heavy enemy fire. It also makes a great target shooting pistol. Just get ready to burn through some CO2!

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 400 (with .20 gram BBs)
Accuracy: Spectacular
Power: CO2
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: TSD Sports

Video Review:

Crash-Course in Airsoft (The Basics of Airsoft)

Airsoft is as close to real combat you can get, without putting your life in peril. Airsoft is usually a team sport, and people of all ages everywhere are getting in on the action. The whole point is: take out the enemy and don’t get shot doing it. The rules are different everywhere, and depending on how many people are playing, the rules can vary from all out war, to if you get hit you must sit out for the rest of the round until a team has won, to capture the flag, to just friendly backyard skirmishes. There’s almost infinite ways to play, and there’s not a right or a wrong way.

The most important and most basic thing you need for airsofting is a airsoft gun. Basically how a airsoft gun works is, in some fashion, a spring is compressed along with a little pocket of air, which propels a BB (BBs are small plastic spheres that airsoft guns shoot. They usually have a diameter of 6mm, so they’re pretty small).  There’s several different types of guns, here’s a little list of the three different types:

AEG (Automatic Electric Gun)
– This is battery powered. You must charge a 7-12 (sometimes greater) volt battery and hook it up to the gun to give it power. As far as batteries go, there’s two measurements that come into play: Volts – volts measure how powerful the battery is, the more volts, the faster a gun will shoot, and also the higher rate of fire and velocity there will be (even a small upgrade in battery can dramatically improve a gun). The only down side is that if you have to strong of a battery, it might overwhelm the gun and break it. The second measurement is mAh – this is how much power a battery can store. For example, a 1200 mAh battery can last a (let’s say) 10 hour battle; a 1800 mAh battery can last a 14 hour battle. That’s just some basic examples of different battery terminology.

The upside of an AEG is that it is usually fully automatic, which means with a single pull of the trigger multiple BB’s can be fired. AEG’s are the most popular type of airsoft gun for fights because of this. Out shooting the enemy is the biggest advantage you can have in any kind of gun fight. AEG’s usually have relatively good FPS (feet per second; I’ll talk about FPS later) which is also a benefit.

Spring/Bolt Action – Spring/Bolt Action powered means you must cock something back before each shot. On pistols you usually cock the slide back, rifles usually have a charging handle on the top or on the side, and revolvers you must cock the hammer back. Either way, what it does is compress a spring and capture air that will then help propel the BB. This type of gun is the most common type because of its simplicity, cheapness, and because it will fire under extreme heat/coldness where the batteries inside AEG’s or the CO2 inside Gas Powered guns might fail in extreme weather. You can even get spring guns wet and muddy and they still will fire (although, you should clean and dry them if they get wet because the springs will rust). But, as stated before, spring powered guns require you cock back the slide/cocking mechanism which make them slow to shoot, so they just can’t compete with AEG’s and Gas Powered guns.

Bolt action is the same thing as spring powered; basically you compress a spring to shoot the BB, it’s just in a different form. With bolt action, you take a handle and rack it back then forward again to compress the spring and get a BB in the chamber, exactly as you would with real guns (except with real bullets, also). But bolt action can compress stronger springs which results in higher FPS. This is why bolt action is almost exclusively used on sniper rifles. If you’re confused, the main difference is that with bolt action you pull a big bolt back, and with spring action you simply rack a charging handle. But, bolt can produce higher FPS than spring.

CO2/Green Gas – This type of gun requires a CO2/Green Gas power outlet to work. All you have to do is screw in your power outlet and you’re ready to shoot. With CO2 and Green Gas powered guns the emphasis is on power.

An example of CO2 power outlets

Since CO2/Green Gas is doing the work instead of springs (AEG’s and Spring/Bolt Action require springs to work), the BB can be shot at much higher velocities (C02 and Green Gas still use springs, they’re just not so vital). And like AEG’s, you don’t have to cock back each time which means you can fire as fast as you can pull the trigger. Usually Co2/Green Gas are only semi-automatic which means with every pull of the trigger one shot is fired, but there are a handful of fully-automatic Co2/Green Gas out there. Fully-automatic means with one pull of the trigger, multiple BBs can be fired.

*

Now for some terms you hear a lot in airsoft:

The difference between full-automatic and semi-automatic – if you didn’t understand fully/semi-automatic guns from the descriptions I gave above, I’ll explain it further. Semi-automatic means that every time you pull the trigger, one bullet/BB will shoot out. Fully-automatic means that if you pull the trigger, multiple bullets/BBs can be fired. As long as you hold down the trigger with fully-automatic, a steady stream of BBs will be shooting out. To give you a idea of which type of gun usually does what (this is just a general overlook, there can be exceptions):

AEG’s – usually have both fully and semi-automatic features
Spring/Bolt Action – neither; you must manually pull some sort of charging lever back before each shot
Co2/Green Gas – Usually semi-automatic only. Although, there are a couple of fully-automatic models out there

Now, for those who are completely new to airsoft or any type of gun, what the “safety” feature is. Every gun has safety, every single type and model; it is both unsafe and illegal to have a firearm without a working safety. A safety locks the trigger into place, so that a gun won’t go off by bumping into things. When a working safety is on, it is impossible to discharge the gun. It’s just that simple. Every airsofter (and firearm owner, for that matter) must always have their gun on safety when not in use.

ROF (Rate of Fire) is how many BB’s a gun, usually a AEG, will fire per minuet. Pretty simple. So if a gun had a ROF of 800, that means, that it will fire 800 BBs in one minuet.

There’s also a couple different types of “Blow-back” airsoft guns. Blow-back just means that when you fire the gun, the slide will blow back, just like a real gun. Blow-back airsoft guns can be Co2 or Electric (AEG). The benefits to a blow-back gun is that it looks realistic, and it chambers a BB each shot, so that it shoots as fast as you can pull the trigger, unless it’s fully-automatic, which would basically make it a blow-back AEG. GBB (Gas Blow-Back) is basically a Co2 powered blow-back airsoft gun. EGG (Electric Blow-Back) is a Electric powered blow-back (although electric powered blow-backs are pretty rare, and usually have horrible FPS and accuracy. So, chances are that you’ll never really hear the term “EGG”). The down side of a blow-back airsoft gun, while it’s semi or fully-automatic, it costs much more money than a Co2 or AEG, plus Co2’s and AEG’s already are semi/fully-auto. And, since the slide comes back, it drains batteries and Co2 cartridges much faster than normal. So really, blow-backs just look cool.

Another term you might hear in airsoft is “CQB”. All that stands for is “Close Quarter Battle”. Basically, all that means if a gun is good for CQB, is that it’s good for close-up fighting (usually 20 feet or under). Another way you might hear CQB is a type of game mode. It’s the same thing, any shooting taking place when your target is 20 feet or closer; most of the time CQB is indoors, just because indoors are usually smaller spaces, but it can also be outdoors. Lower FPS guns are best for Close Quarter Battle, because higher FPS guns hurt to much at short range.

FPS (Feet Per Second) is a measurement used to describe how fast the BB will be traveling as it leaves the barrel. For example, if a airsoft gun has a label “375 FPS” it means when the BB exits the barrel of the gun, it will be traveling 375 feet per second. This can be calculated to better understand it to 256 Miles Per Hour. So, 375 FPS = 256 MPH. This may seem fast, but keep in mind this is barrel velocity. As soon as the BB leaves the barrel it starts slowing down. It will lose at least 25% of its speed by the time the BB actually gets to your target. Also, manufactures try to look better by trying to get the highest FPS out of their gun; so what they do is take a .12 gram BB and calculate how fast a .12 gram BB (we’ll get to what the ‘grams’ matter in a moment) is traveling right as it leaves the barrel. The bottom line is, when you’re looking at a gun’s FPS, take at least 75 off of it right away. The manufacturer’s FPS is always higher than the real thing. The effect of FPS in the field is, the higher the FPS, the faster the BB will go, the more accurate it will be, and the longer it will travel.

Now for what “grams” mean. A gram is a measurement of weight. Obviously a .12 gram BB will be lighter than a .20 gram; a .20 gram will be lighter than a .25 gram, etc. The weight of standard airsoft BB’s are from .12-.45 gram weight. The heavier the weight, the more accurate. That’s why most players use .20 and up for almost every gun. The drawback of a heavier BB is that it will dramatically decrease the FPS. Usually the general rule of thumb is, the higher the FPS, the higher gram BB you should use. 200 FPS and under is best with .12 gram; 200-400 = .20 gram; etc. Also, guns with their hop-up wound to lose should use a higher gram BB (Hop-Up, I’ll explain next). Or if the gun is fully-automatic then you should use almost strictly .20 gram because anything less/more could jam. So, you should weigh out the accuracy to power ratio to find the best weight BB for your gun.

And now for hop-up. Almost every gun has it now. Hop-Up puts a back spin on your BB, making it more accurate, and a whole lot better distance. At close range, hop-up can be annoying because the BB will tend to go upwards and be less accurate. But at long ranges, hop-up is vital, adding distance and accuracy. The “tighter” a hop-up is wound, the less backspin will be put on the BB. The “looser” the hop-up is wound the more backspin will be put on a BB. Looser = more hop-up, and the the BB will tend to float up after 50 feet. Tighter = less hop-up, and the BB will sink after about 50 feet. (When a BB will either float or sink [50 feet, 60 feet, 70 feet, etc.] depends on the velocity of your gun) If you’re target is 30 feet away you probably want less hop-up, and if your target is 70 feet away you want more hop-up. It all depends on the situation. All-and-all, hop-up is good.

A alternative to hop-up is BAXS. BAXS is relatively new to airsofters, and has gotten a so-so reception because of airsofters’ loyalty and comfort level with hop-up. BAXS is in no way bad, though. With hop-up there’s two points of contact on the BB while it’s in the chamber, the top and bottom. With BAXS there’s three points of contact, two on the top and one on the bottom. Basically, BAXS gives you more control over the BB, so instead of floating up or down after 50/60/70 feet, the BB will continue going straight. BAXS is mostly on cheaper guns because they tend to have less FPS and it would be inaccurate to have hop-up. Although, it’s not totally uncommon to have BAXS on higher end airsoft guns.

Well, that’s the end of the “crash-course” on airsoft. Congratulations on reading the whole thing. If you have any further questions regarding airsoft, email me at (sirbuffalosushi@gmail.com) or leave a comment.

(This is a posted copy of Airsofter United’s page, “Crash Course“)