Umarex Tactical Force Combat CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Umarex Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back) airsoft pistol. It’s mostly made of metal, with the exception of the grip, and in many ways resembles a Glock. It requires standard 12 gram CO2 cartridges to operate.

The Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back), as mentioned before, meaning that the slide jolts backwards every time you pull the trigger, just like a real gun. However, the Combat’s slide only blows-back about 3/4 of an inch, making it look and feel less realistic. It’s also a little clunky, meaning that the slide doesn’t blow back in a single, smooth motion; it’s almost feels like the slide is shuttering back and forth. This not only makes the gun feel sluggish, it makes more difficult to keep your sights on target when you’re shooting.

GBB’s are known for their ability to “shoot as fast as you can pull the trigger”, but the Tactical Force Combat can easily malfunction when being shot too fast. Often times it will dry fire and then fire two BBs on your next shot if you shoot too rapidly. This isn’t a huge deal, it just forces you to slow down and take your time, which is usually a good thing anyway. However, it’s still a hassle for the times that it’s necessary to put BBs down range at a fast pace.

The Combat also isn’t one of the more accurate pistols out there. At 15-20ft with .20 gram BBs it can hit a 12-inch Gel Trap with decent consistency. However, at ranges over 25 feet, the BB starts to sink and is very inaccurate.

The sights are both good and bad. The front sight consists of a little white rod stuck through a standard black blade front sight, giving you a sort of white-dot sight. The back sights are made of a little bent green rod that is also stuck through a standard back sight, giving you a sort of green-dot sight. The contrast of green on white dots makes aiming and acquiring targets easy and fast. However, if you looked at the sights from the side, the green and white rods stick all the way through the standard sights, popping out the other side, making them look sloppy. But this is only a cosmetic issue, and doesn’t effect performance.

The Combat boosts a impressive 400FPS (Feet Per Second) with .12 gram BBs, and averages between 350 and 380FPS with .20 gram BBs, depending on how new the CO2 cartridge is. Although .12 gram BBs have higher velocity, I’d recommend only using .20 gram BBs because they’re much more accurate.

Through all the downsides, the Combat gets extremely good shots-per-CO2. The blow-back starts wearing down after about 8-10 magazines and the slide stops being blown back far enough for the slide lock to catch, but it still shoots BBs consistently up until 14-16 magazines. This is great if you’re planning on using it in a airsoft war, minimizing downtime.

To put the CO2 cartridge into the gun you simply press a button on the bottom of the gun, directly behind the magazine, which releases the part of the grip, revealing a small compartment. From there, you fit the cartridge into the compartment and screw it in.

The magazine is just like any other GBB magazine. There’s a little metal lever on the side of the magazine that you pull down to the bottom and lock in place. Once locked in place, you pour BBs into a small hole near the bottom of the magazine and then unlock the metal piece, putting tension on the BBs. The magazine holds 15 rounds and is full metal, making it both durable and relatively high-capacity.

One of the more notable issues it the safety. Instead of simply sliding the switch back and forth, in order switch between “fire” and “safe” you must push the switch inwards and then back/forward. It’s very difficult to do this with one finger, forcing you to hold the gun in one hand while trying to manipulate the safety with the other. However, after switching between fire and safe multiple times, it starts to loosen up.

The last thing worth noting is some of the little details. On the trigger itself there’s a mock safety, it looks like a smaller trigger coming out of the normal trigger, which on a real gun you press down along with the trigger to fire; although it doesn’t do anything on this gun, and is just for show. Another cool feature is the slide lock. As soon as you’ve discharged the last round, the slide stays back, indicating you’ve run out of ammo.

In a wrap, the Tactical Force Combat pistol has a lot of issues, but also has potential. It’s great for CQB, but fails to stay consistent at long ranges. It also has a large magazine, and features very good shots-per-cartridge. The blow-back is a neat feature, but ultimately reduces accuracy. It’s really not a bad gun, but just not one of the best.

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UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip

The UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is one of the more basic grips out there, although it’s sturdy and gets the job done.

One of the biggest issues you might have is mounting it. It’s designed for Picatinny rails, which are smaller than the Weaver rails that are more commonly used in airsoft. The sides which grip the rail are also fixed, so you can’t make them any larger. But, if you push hard enough, you should be able to slide it on after a little trial and error. Once you get it on you simply tighten the big knob on the bottom to keep the grip from sliding backwards and forwards.

A cool thing about the UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is that it’s ambidextrous. This means that it can be used for both right and left handed shooters.

There’s also two little plastic pieces on either side of the grip that are removable to make room for a pressure pad (flashlights, lasers, etc). To remove them, you just twist off the knob that keeps the grip from sliding backwards/forwards and they will just slide right off. And, like I said, there’s a piece on either side so that you can put the pressure pad on either side, depending on which hand you shoot with.

Another nice feature is the hidden compartment. The knob that keeps the grip in place/takes the plastic pieces off and on is really hollowed out. And there’s a little cap on the end of the knob that you can screw off to reveal the compartment. It’s mostly meant for carrying spare batteries, but you can carry anything from a folded up piece of paper to extra BBs very easily.

As far as sturdiness, the Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is very sturdy. It has no wobble at all and doesn’t budge even if you accidentally hit it against something while shooting in CQB. It’s even more sturdy if you did mount it on a Weaver rail because it fit so tight to begin with. You can even use it as a bi-pod if you’re lying down.

Using the grip does wear on you after a while. While it does make your gun more stable and therefore more accurate, it’s difficult to hold your arm out at length, with the weight of the gun on you, without wearing yourself out very quickly. Try holding your hand almost all the way out in a fist; you’ll start to feel uncomfort in under three minuets. Now try holding your hand closer to your body, right in front of wear the magazine would be, with you palm comfortably pointing upwards; you should be able to hold that stance for longer.

Although, you’re going to have that problem with any grip. Plus, the adrenalin from being in a airsoft fight (or real gun fight, if that’s what you’re planning on using it for) will give you a boost so that you won’t even feel it.

In a wrap, the UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is a very sturdy, basic grip, but gets the job done. It has a couple cool features, and is also cheap for what it’s worth. Overall, I think this is a great investment for any kind of rifle, airsoft and real.

NcSTAR Red-Dot Sight (With 4 Different Reticles) Review

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is a great multipurpose battery powered optic. With 4 different reticles, you can use it for a wide range of situations from pin-point long distant shots to Close Quarter Battle. It comes with an extra battery, a lens cover, a Allen Wrench, a small screw driver to open the battery compartment with, a cloth to clean the lens with, and a manual. It’s also available in black, camouflage, and silver.

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is really a lot smaller than it looks. It’s roughly three inches long, one and a half inches wide, and two inches tall. Its small size isn’t necessarily bad, though. Its low profile is great for CQB and also makes it lighter if you have an already heavy gun.

One of the biggest attractions is the 4 different reticles: a small crosshair, a regular dot, a circle within a circle, and another small crosshair with a circle around the center. You can easily change between them by turning a knob on the very back of the sight. Having 4 different reticles is great, like I said before, because of its versatility. If you need to make a pin-point sniper shot you can switch to the normal red-dot, but if you need to go into a building or a tight space, you can switch to the circle within a circle reticle.

There’s also 7 different brightness settings. 1 being for darker surroundings and 7 being for bright surroundings. You change the brightness by turning the big knob in the middle of the sight.

The reticle is projected onto the glass by a little window near the back of the sight. If you look at the sight backwards you can actually see a miniature version of the reticle with a light shining on it inside the little window. This means if you’re using the NcSTAR Red-Dot sight at nighttime, someone could spot you from the light inside the sight. This, however, is something you just have to live with because all red-dot sight are more or less going to have the same problem.

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight easily mounts to any standard weaver/picatinny rail by unscrewing the bolts on the side with the included Allen Wrench and then tightening them back up once you have the sight positioned on your rail.

Adjusting the sight is also very easy. There’s a bolt on the top of the sight, and one on the side. You simply turn the bolt on the top right or left to make it the reticle aim higher or lower, and turn the bolt on the side left or right to make the reticle air more left or right. But, straight out of the box, it was already deadly accurate on my personal Jing Jong M4 airsoft rifle.

The last thing worth noting is the battery. It’s a CR2023 3-volt Micro Lithium Battery and can be accessed by unscrewing the very top of the brightness-selector knob. Like I said before; it comes with a spare, but they last quite a while so you might not even need it.

To wrap things up, the NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is one of the best out there. It’s small and low profile, but still gets the job done. And it’s very customizable and can easily adapt to what you want to use it for. You really can ask much more from a red-dot sight.