UTG Blister Airsoft Speedloader Review

Airsoft speedloaders reduce reloading time by pushing multiple BBs into the magazine with a single press of a button.

Operating the UTG Blister speedloader is pretty simple: First you fill the speedloader up with BBs. You then place the small cylinder shaped piece, located at the bottom of the speedloader, into where you’d normally insert the BBs into your airsoft rifle magazine. From there, you press a circular button, located near the top of the speedloader, which releases the long plastic piece that you can see coming out of the top of the loader in the picture above. Finally, you simply push the long arm piece downwards, and it will push BBs into the magazine.

The Blister speedloader holds about 115 BBs and ejects 4 BBs with every push of the arm. It actually does reduce reloading time quite substantially, oppose to manually reloading one BB at a time by hand.

It’s made entirely of plastic, but can withstand drops on soft surfaces.

The Blister speedloader comes with pistol magazine adapter. It’s just a small plastic piece that snaps onto the end of the speedloader and helps the speedloader stay flush against bulky spring pistol magazines while you pump BBs into it.

In a wrap, the UTG Blister speedloader is a vital piece of equipment for the 3-$5 it costs, especially if you play actual airsoft skirmishes. It cuts down loading time and keeps you in the game.

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Rothco Outdoorsman Rucksack Review

The Rothco Outdoorsman Rucksack is a somewhat basic rucksack with multiple pockets, padded adjustable shoulder straps and a waist-strap for added support.

The Outdoorsman Rucksack is made almost completely of thin canvas material, with the exception of the straps and plastic buckles, which makes it light, but also a little less durable. It’s not delicate by any means, you can load quite a bit of weight into it without it faltering (I loaded my personal one up with 20lbs. worth of airsoft equipment and it didn’t seem to have any problems). Although, there’s a draw string underneath the flap at the top of the rucksack that you pull to close up the main compartment, and if you pull it to hard, it will start tearing into the fabric and cause it to fray.

The Outdoorsman Rucksack has 4 compartments: a main one which basically makes up the whole rucksack, two smaller side pockets on either side, and one pocket right on the front of the rucksack. Unless you’re carrying a single, large item, the big main pocket is kind of a waste. Because the main compartment is literally just a big empty pocket, with no kind of sorting or smaller compartments inside it. So if you want to put a bunch of smaller things in there (duct-tape, airsoft BBs, books, food, whatever), they get all mixed up and smashed. A solution to this is to get a bunch of smaller bags/backpacks  and place the smaller items in them, then put the bags into the big compartment. And the other 3 pockets aren’t even that big, nor do they have any type of sub-pockets, either.

Another thing to note is that rucksacks and backpacks are different. A backpack holds its shape and stays high up on your back, they also have a bunch of smaller pockets to store little items in. But a rucksack, like the Outdoorsman, is more or less a fabric bag that has no shape and hangs low on your back unless you put a large object into it to give it some shape. That’s why rucksacks are meant for holding bigger items like sleeping bags or wood (that’s why the Outdoorsman has that big unorganized compartment that I mentioned). Rucksacks aren’t bad, they’re just meant for different purposes then backpacks. So, if you’re thinking about buying the Outdoorsman Rucksack, just make sure you actually do want a rucksack and not a backpack.

Although, the large amount that the Outdoorsman Rucksack provides does come in handy. To give you an idea how much just the one big compartment will hold, deflated, the Intex Explorer 200 Inflatable Boat will fit with plenty of room to spare. Plus, you can stash another few small items in the other 3 pockets.

All in all, the Outdoorsman is a fairly good rucksack. As long as you’re sure you want a rucksack, it’s durable and can hold a load of weight. The waist-strap and adjustable shoulder straps also let it fit very well. For the price of $15-$25, you really can’t go wrong.

Walther Special Operations P99 Airsoft Gun Review

The Walther P99 is a very iconic gun used world-wide; from James Bond to the German police to the latest Modern Warfare game. The Walther P99 airsoft gun is obviously a replica of the real thing. It comes with a silencer, extra magazine, and a larger grip replacement.

The main thing people notice when they look at the Walther P99 airsoft gun is the silencer. It’s suppose to be a “mock” silencer that’s just for show, but there’s a noticeably quieter sound when you shoot with the silencer on oppose to off. The silencer is removable (it simply screws on and off) but when you take it off, there’s a one-inch long orange tip that doubles as the thing that the silencer screws onto. It looks absolutely terrible, but it doesn’t effect performance. Also, the silencer completely obstructs the iron sights, making aiming much harder.

The orange tip doubling as the thing that the silencer screws onto  is an all-out design flaw/shortcut that Umarex (the manufacturer of this gun) took because it’s much cheaper to produce this way. Not only does the tip look horrible when the silencer is taken off, but it’s also very weak because it’s only made of plastic. This causes the silencer to break right off the gun, taking the orange tip with it, if you are at all rough with it.

Even if you manage not to break your silencer, it makes the whole gun very inaccurate. Because the silencer isn’t properly anchored to the gun, if you even slightly bump it it will bend a little bit and send BBs flying in every-which direction.

With the silencer taken off, the Walther P99 airsoft pistol is pretty accurate with .20 gram BBs. Even in the wind, it can hit a 12 inch gel target from 30 feet away with good consistency. And the sights are exactly like the ones on the real P99 which adds to the realism.

The magazines that come with the Walther P99 are really good. They hold 15 rounds and have a 100 round reservoir. The reservoir makes reloading time much quicker, since you can reload right from the magazine itself. Although, they are made completely out of light plastic, which makes them less durable and feel cheap.

The larger grip that the Walther P99 comes with is great for people with large hands. To replace the normal sized grip with the bigger one all you have to do is remove a pin and the grip will come right off, then you can just push the other one right on and put the pin back in. The larger grip makes the whole grip much bigger, although it isn’t flush with the rest of the gun and looks kind of stupid with a considerable gap between the grip and the handle. It’s sturdy and does the job, though.

The safety is absolutely ridicules. It’s a tiny little half-circle that you have to pinch with your index finger and thumb and turn to select “fire” or “safe”. If you need to take the gun out and start shooting in a timely manner, which you usually have to do with sidearms, it takes over three extra seconds to hold the P99 in one hand and turn off the safety with the other. This wasted time can result in you being tagged in a airsoft skirmish.

The last thing that’s worth noting about the Walther P99 is a little red dot on the back of the gun that pops up when there’s a BB in the chamber and goes back down when there’s not. This kind of makes the gun look even more like a toy, but the red warning dot can be helpful if you just pick the gun up and don’t know if it’s loaded. Personally, I like this feature.

To wrap things up, the Walther P99 Special Operations airsoft pistol is a okay spring pistol. The silencer looks cool, but really doesn’t serve much purpose and is very easy to break. And the magazines are really the highlight of the whole gun. I would think of this gun more as “just for show” kind or gun (like a airsoft revolver); it truly doesn’t have much useability, but it’s unique and different. For the $20 that it costs, though, as long as you’re very gentle with the silencer, it’s worth the buy.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 300
Accuracy: Bad with the suppressor, Moderately accurate without it
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before every shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Umarex

20 Tips and Pointers to Greatly Improve Your Airsoft Skills

These are 20 tips and pointers to greatly improve your airsoft game. As long as you keep these tips in mind, you will see much improved accuracy, focus, and overall performance in your airsoft. But, read these tips with a grain of salt, for example, numbers 12 and 13; having a bunch of different guns gives you versatility to use different style guns in different situations. But the point 12 and 13 are making is that if you are thinking about spending a bunch of money on a bunch of different guns, maybe you should think about buying one really good gun or upgrades for a gun you already have, instead.

  1. Always use your sights. You should almost never fire from the hip, even with fully-automatic guns.
  2. Practice how you would be in a game. Wear all the equipment, clothing, and use the exact guns that you would be using in a actual airsoft match while you practice.
  3. Use the correct BB weight for each individual gun. When you first get a gun, you should test which BB weight works best for that gun (test with the three major BB weights: .12 gram, .20 gram, and .25 gram). Look for accuracy and how far the BB will go before it lands.
  4. Keep a good grip on your gun while you’re shooting. Keep the stock (if you have a stock) firmly pressed against your shoulder and your weak hand holding the gun, while your strong hand pulls the trigger.
  5. With spring pistols, keep the gun in your strong hand and cock the slide with your weak hand. (Some people do it the opposite way because it’s easier to cock with your strong hand, but it decreases accuracy)
  6. Take your time and aim. Don’t panic and start firing if you see a opponent in a airsoft match, take you time to line up your sights and make a accurate shot.
  7. Once you fire, don’t wait around to see if you hit your target. After the BB leaves the barrel, there’s nothing more you can do. Immediately re-arm (get another BB chambered) your weapon before bothering to see if you’ve hit. If you missed, fire again. If you hit, move on.
  8. Wear the appropriate clothing. If you’re hot/cold/uncomfortable you’ll start hurrying shots and sacrificing accuracy.
  9. Calm yourself before a airsoft match. If you go in angry, nervous, etc. you will make mistakes. Get in the mind set of a robot: you need to remember all of what you’ve learned while practicing and what you’ve read in this post and complete your mission.
  10. Practice makes perfect. I know I’ve mentioned practicing before, but it’s vital that you do so. The more BBs you put down range the better you’ll get.
  11. Push yourself. If you push yourself to hit a 12-inch target at 50 feet away, think about how easy it’ll be to hit a player from 20 feet. Try to find your maximum range and then practice from even farther away.
  12. Upgrade the airsoft guns you have instead of buying more of them. Investing in optics, extra magazines, and accessories will greatly improve your performance with that gun. Besides, you can only shoot one gun at a time anyway.
  13. Invest in a good quality gun. This adds to number 12, if you invest in a more expensive, better gun, it’ll pay off. AEG’s (Automatic Electronic Gun), for example, are good to invest in. They’re usually fully-automatic and one will serve you better than the two cheaper spring guns that you could have bought for the same amount of money.
  14. When retreating, don’t attempt to fire back. You should only retreat when it’s your last option and you’ve already tried everything to hold back opposing players. That said, you shouldn’t turn around to fire back if you’re already retreating. If you couldn’t hold off opposing players staying still, you’re not going to do anything randomly firing backwards as you are trying to run away. The chances of actually hitting someone is slim and trying will only slow you down and give the other team time to catch up to you.
  15. Be tactical. For example, if you’re planning to come around a corner (this especially applies for CQB game-play), take out your secondary, which is smaller and lighter than your primary, and breech the corner with that. This will allow you to bring your gun up and aim much faster than you would using your primary. As soon as you’ve cleared the corner, though, start using your primary again.
  16. Use all the tools at your disposal. If you have a airsoft grenade, don’t be afraid to use it. The same goes for if you have a flashlight, secondary, speed re-loader, or any other tool you may have. Make it as easy for yourself as you can.
  17. If cover is available use it. Unlike video games, though, visual cover might not be the greatest choice. The mandatory orange tip on the mussel of every airsoft gun pretty much makes it imposable to try to hide. If you’re laying down in visual cover and are spotted you are in some deep trouble. On the other hand, using physical cover is a good strategy. You can pop in and out of physical cover, making quick shots when you come out and then immediately going back in, gives the opposing players very little chance to hit you.
  18. When there’s a break in the action, you should immediately reload. When you do reload, make sure you’re completely maxed out. Depending on how safe you are, take time to get a BB in the chamber as well as completely reloading your magazine. Make sure to keep an eye out for enemy players and at least a couple bullets loaded into one of your weapons, while you reload the other one; you’re most vulnerable when you’re reloading.
  19. We’ve already mentioned practice multiple times before, but it’s important to maximizing your practice time. Apart from “pushing yourself”, drills are the best way to go. Practice everything: reloading, shooting while moving, shooting while lying down, coming in and out of cover, etc.. Do a drill multiple times. It will get boring and frustrating after a while but you just need to take a little break, reestablish yourself, and keep on going. Succession is key.
  20. The last tip is one of the most important and the most obvious. Take care of your guns and they will take care of you. Keep them in a safe place where they won’t be broken, lube and clean them as necessary, and (as mentioned before) give them the right ammunition.

Stinger P9T Airsoft Gun Review

The Stinger P9T is a updated version of Crosman’s legendary Stinger P9. Updates include a updated safety, a larger profile, and a larger 15 round magazine.

One of the bigger updates was to the magazine. The Stinger P9T can hold 15 rounds, oppose to the Stinger P9’s 12. But a huge downside it that it no longer has a reservoir. This is a big deal if you plan to use it in airsoft fights. Also, the magazine’s bigger than the old one, so you can’t even use old P9 magazines.

The safety is located very close to the back of the gun so that it’s hard to reach. You have to pretty much hold the gun with your weak hand and then flip the safety forwards or backwards with your strong hand to effectively work it. I don’t know why Crosman decided to do that; probably so that kids with small hands can operate it better. It’s also reversed, meaning that forward is safety and back is fire. This is a design flaw because when you shove it into a holster, sometimes the holster catches it and it switches it to fire.

The old Stinger P9 was known for it’s smooth slide and easy trigger pull, but the Stinger P9T just isn’t the same. When you pull the slide back to cock it it feels like you’re grinding metal on metal. Also, the slide only pulls back about a inch, making it feel like you didn’t cock it all the way. The trigger pull is not for the weak, either. You have to really squeeze it to make it fire. This heavy trigger pull really slows you down when you’re trying to put some plastic down range.

One thing that didn’t change is the stunning accuracy. With .25 gram BBs you can hit a 12 inch gel target from well over 40 feet away. If the Stinger P9 and the Stinger P9T went head-to-head, I’d actually have to say that the Stinger P9T is a little bit more accurate.

Another good thing about the Stinger P9T is that it has a lot more metal than the old Stinger P9. The trigger is metal, along with several internal pieces that are visible with the clear plastic colored models.

With most of the Stinger P9T’s you get a holster included. But the holster is terrible. The old holsters that came with the Stinger P9’s had a Velcro strap on the back so that you could easily take it on and off. It also had a snap thing that you could take the strap that secures your gun into the holster off with, and you could also undo a clip and get the strap off that way. These new holsters just have a loop on the back to put your belt through, meaning you have to undo your whole belt to get it on and off. Also the only thing that keeps the gun securing strap in place is a narrow strip of Velcro.

The last thing that you’ll notice about the Stinger P9T is it’s weight. It is really heavy; unloaded it weighs close to 1-1/2 pounds! This is good and bad. On the one hand it feels very realistic and solid, but on the other it might start to wear on you after a hour or two of shooting.

Through all the down sides, the Stinger P9T can be a good side arm. In my mind, it doesn’t quite stack up to the Stinger P9, although the accuracy is actually a little better. If you make sure to use .25 gram BBs, buy a better holster, and possibly buy some extra magazines, it could make a pretty good spring pistol.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 275
Accuracy: Great
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .25 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Crosman

Video Review:

Airsoft: Getting Started

Airsoft is a fun and thrilling sport, beating video games any day with real action and a real risk of getting shot.

If you’re completely new you can get familiar with some airsoft lingo here: www.airsofterunited.wordpress.com/crash-course

The first thing you want to make sure of is that you’re sure you want to get into airsoft. While it’s extremely fun and builds good morals by working on a team, it can also hurt when you get shot and you should be willing to invest good money into it. If you know you don’t want to be shot by a airsoft gun from time to time then you shouldn’t even consider getting into airsoft, just get a BB gun to shoot targets with. Also understand that in order to have good guns, gear, camouflage and other things you need for airsoft that you’ll have to spend a lot of money on it.

If you’re sure you want to get into airsoft then the first thing you need is a gun. For someone just starting airsoft you should look at getting a spring powered gun (again, if you don’t know what “spring powered” means then you should read the crash-course). Spring powered guns are cheap, easy to maintain and super durable. Crosman is an example of really good spring guns. I highly recommend something along the lines of the Crosman Stinger R34 or the Crosman Stinger P9.

Once you find a gun that you like you should buy things for it instead of buying more guns. For example, extra magazines, sights, etc..

Taking care of your guns is a big deal, too. Besides the usual cleaning and lubrication that you should be doing anyway, make sure to keep your guns somewhere safe (in a closet or something). Do not just throw them in the corner with your backpack and dirty cloths. A broken gun won’t do you much good. Also give your gun the right ammunition. The three big BB weights are .12, .20, and .25 gram. Try each weight in your gun to see which preforms the best. Don’t buy cheap .12 gram if your gun doesn’t shoot well with it just to save money!

Beyond your guns you should also work on a collection of camouflage clothing and safety equipment. A pair of safety glasses, a camo long-sleeved shirt, and a backpack should be all you need to start out. As you get more experienced and better at airsoft you may start thinking about airsoft vests, gillie suits, airsoft gloves and other things, but you really don’t need those until you have been playing airsoft for a while.

Usually beginners don’t have enough money to blow on BBs; not with all the guns and gear that their buying in order to get started. That’s why it’s a great idea to buy a Gel-Trap Target. They run you about $8 if you get them from the store in the outdoors/airsoft section. And the idea of the Gel-Trap Target is that when you shoot it, the BB sticks and then drips down into a collecting trey so that you can reuse them. This saves you a fortune on BBs.

Getting into a airsoft club is the best way to jump right into the action. Although, almost always you have to be either over 16 and have a parent drive you to matches or be 18 or older. And usually airsoft clubs are pretty limited unless you live in a area where airsofting is popular. But, chances are that usually beginning airsofters learn of airsoft from a friend, so you should consult them on any known clubs in the area or if they have lots of friends that also airsoft, then you can just have a unofficial fight with a bunch of their friends.

Having actual airsoft matches are the best way to gain experience, but practice also helps. Take your Gel-Trap target out in your backyard and start shooting. As you get more used to your gun, you can start shooting while running and laying down. Practice definitely makes perfect.

A last thing to think about as a beginning airsofter is what role you want to play in the future. For people just starting out I suggested the Stinger R34 (an assault rifle) and the Stinger P9 (a all-purpose pistol) above, but as you progress at airsoft you should start thinking about a specialty role that you could play. Roles include snipers, supportive fire, assault, and things like that. For example, I’m a assault guy so I carry around a M4 rifle and 1911 pistol. Some of the people I know specialize in sniping and they have a gillie suit, binoculars, and a sniper rifle. It’s up to you what you want to be. But, as a beginner, you don’t need to decide right now. Just start with the guns I suggested since they’re all-purpose weapons and go from there.

I hope this post helps you get started airsofting, and good luck!

(This is a posted copy of Airsofter United’s page, “Getting Started“)

How to Make a Airsoft Grenade

Airsoft grenades that you can find on the internet are usually expensive and almost always require gas/CO2 to operate. This means that unless you’re ready to deal with the expense that come with real airsoft grenades, you’re stuck making one yourself. Making it yourself isn’t all bad, though. It’s cheaper and you don’t have to wait for shipping, and you can modify it for bigger/smaller explosions.

This is what you’ll need:

  • Small water bottle (the thinner the plastic the better. Some cheap 20oz Aquafina bottles are great)
  • .12 gram airsoft BBs
  • A couple tissues
  • Vinegar
  • Baking Soda

Step 1 – The first thing you want to do is fill your bottle up about half way with vinegar (maybe a little more than half way). Then pour about 30 airsoft BBs into the bottle. You can use more or less BBs depending on how many people you want to hit.

Step 2 – Take a tissue and lay it out flat. In the middle pour about 1oz of baking soda (the more baking soda, the bigger the boom, just make sure that your roll isn’t to fat to fit through the mouth of the bottle) then roll the tissue up, making a long straw type shape. Make sure to fold up both ends at some point during when you’re getting to the end of rolling it up, making sure that no baking soda will fall out the top or bottom.

Step 3 – Now when you’re ready to throw your grenade, drop the baking soda roll through the mouth of the bottle, screw the cap of the bottle on as tight as you can and then shake. You should feel the bottle getting bigger and bigger in your hand. When you think it’s about to blow, whip it at something solid near your targets. Pavement is ideal, but a wood structure or anything else is good. If you simply toss it on the ground it may not build enough pressure to explode; the best thing to do is whip it at something solid, as stated above. The thinner the plastic is on your bottle is the better chance you’ll have of a good explosion.

When the grenade goes off the sound is very loud (close to the sound of a gun shot). So, you may not want to use these at night or in the early morning. The bottle also gets completely shredded, so it’s pretty much a one-time use.

BBs fly within a 20-30ft radius. Depending on where you get hit it’ll sting a little bit.

Please give all credit for this project to SirBuffaloSushi and AirsofterUnited.wordpress.com

How to Make a Airsoft Mortar

Mortars are very common over in the Middle-East (among other places), not to mention very effective. Bringing the concept of the mortar to an airsoft field is outright destructive. Unfortunately no one makes airsoft mortars; which means you’re stuck making one yourself. Making it yourself isn’t all bad, though. By making it yourself it’s cheaper, if it needs maintenance you know how to fix it, and it can be plain fun.

This is what you need:

  • A plastic bottle (a small 20oz-ish bottle is perfect)
  • A 1-1/2ft long, 1/2in diameter PVC pipe (the diameter depends on how big the mouth on your bottle is; the PVC pipe just needs to fit snugly into the mouth of the bottle)
  • Electrical tape (or any kind of tape, for that matter; it just has to be able to be peeled off and on multiple times and still work)
  • A latex glove (like the ones doctors use; real thin and stretchable) (you can find ones like these at BJ’s or a automotive store)
  • Spray paint (It’s up to you what color to make your mortar; black is default, but OD Green looks awesome, or you can make it a fun color, it’s up to you)

Step 1 – Take your latex glove and cut a good sized square out of it (3in x 3in will do). Now take that latex square and stretch it over one end of your PVC pipe. Completely cover the hole on the one end. Stretch the latex until it’s close to breaking and tape it firmly in place. It should look something like this:

Step 2 – Slide your PVC pipe with the latex square taped onto it into the mouth of the bottle (latex side first). Slide it about 1/2 an inch into the bottle and then stop. With another piece of tape, secure the PVC pipe into the bottle by wrapping the tape very tightly around the mouth of the bottle, making a airtight seal. It should look like this:

Step 3 – Now all you have left to do is paint it. I recommend using a spray paint that’s meant for plastic, so it won’t peel off when you step on the bottle or peel the tape on and off. This is the final product (I painted mine in a dual-tone black/OD Green kind of thing):

How you shoot your mortar is you put airsoft BBs (7-10 of them) into the open end of the PVC pipe. Then you step on the the bottle with your foot. Stepping on the bottle will automatically raise the PVC pipe in the air a little bit. Put all your weight on the bottle and finally the latex will break and send a surge of air through the PVC pipe and project the BBs. Do not stomp on the bottle, just slowly put more and more weight on it until the latex snaps.

The only down side of this mortar is that to reload you have to unwrap the tape, pull out the PVC pipe, unwrap the other tap, pull off the popped latex, replace it with a new piece of latex, tape it up, put the bottle back on, and re-tape that again. Believe it or not, though, if you get a couple of teammates helping you, you can have it reloaded in about a minuet.

For accurate aiming you can even have a friend lift the PVC pipe up/down a little bit for greater/lesser distance. Although it looks pretty far from a real mortar, it fires just like one; all your BBs should rain down within a 10ft area. The mortar has a effective range of about 50ft. The BBs won’t hurt too bad, but you should be able to tell if you get hit. If you want to take your mortar to the next level (and make it look more like a real mortar), you can take a two sticks and tape them near the front of the PVC pipe (almost like a bipod).

Please give all credit for this project to SirBuffaloSushi and AirsofterUnited.wordpress.com

Beretta 90two Airsoft Gun Review

The 90two airsoft pistol by Beretta is a look-a-like of the Beretta M9. It boasts 260FPS and a 15-round magazine, which is great, whether you’re target shooting or using it in airsoft battles.

The Beretta 90two is almost entirely plastic, with the exceptions of the barrel and a few internal pieces. Although, it feels pretty solid and can withstand a couple drops.

The workings are okay for the most part. The slide is a little sticky, though. And what I mean by that is that when you cock it, it doesn’t make a satisfying click like most airsoft pistols do when you cock it back. So you don’t know if you got a BB in the chamber or not. Also, the magazine release is slow. When you hit the button to release the magazine, you have to shake the gun up and down to get it to fall out. The hammer is also hit or miss. When you pull the hammer back manually, you have to pull the trigger 2-5 times to get it to snap back into place; it just makes the whole gun feel kind of unresponsive. Although, when you pull the whole slide back and that pushes the hammer down, when you fire it usually snaps into place the first time. The safety is even hard to switch; it’s so hard to switch, you may even need to use a butter knife to switch it between safe and fire a couple times to get it loosened up.

The really big issue with the Beretta 90two is the magazine. It’s holds 15 rounds which is great, but it’s prone to breaking. It’s extremely poorly designed. The bottom of the magazine sometimes slides forward when you slam the magazine into the gun, or in the heat of battle it sometimes slides forward too. The problem with this is that the bottom is the only thing holding the little spring that pushes the BBs up into the chamber in place. When the bottom slides out of place the magazine spring flies out, along with your BBs. The simple solution to this is to glue/tape the bottom of the magazine to the actual magazine so it won’t slide forward.

Also, if you’re planning to carry the 90two in a holster, just know that it’s pretty hard to draw. The problem is that the front sight gets caught on the holster, so you have to pinch the holster with one hand and pull the gun out with your other to efficiently draw it. This isn’t a huge issue, just don’t be expecting to whip it out and start shooting.

Some of the good things about the Beretta 90two is it’s accuracy and the price. The 90two features upgraded white dot sights, which helps tremendously for aiming. The relativity high FPS (for a spring pistol) of 260, combined with the upgraded sights makes for very accurate shooting at 20-40ft with .20 gram. .12 gram BBs fly farther, but are way less accurate, so I’d stick to .20 gram. And for only $15-$20 that the 90two goes for, it’s a pretty good gun.

To wrap things up, the Beretta 90two isn’t too bad a gun for $15 or $20; just remember that you get what you pay for. The 90two would do pretty well to someone that’s looking to target shoot, but may not match up to some of the other airsoft pistols in a skirmish. In the end, it’s a good sidearm for a novice to mid-level airsoft player on a tight budget; just know how to deal with some of the problems that come with a cheap airsoft gun.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 260
Accuracy: Accurate at 20-40ft
Power: Spring (you must cock it back before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Beretta

Crosman Auto-Reset Airsoft Target

Simple enough; if you hit one of the targets it goes down. Then you hit the target on the very left and they all pop back up. Unfortunately it’s never that simple.

For starters the Crosman Auto-Reset target’s a pain to put together. You have to pull the mesh netting over some metal bars and hook it over the plastic frame. But, since the netting is so tight, the metal bars want to fold inward. Even when you successfully get it all put together,  the netting still fights the bars and you have to prompt the bars back outwards every couple minuets. Also, the little stand that the actual targets are on snaps to the inside of the plastic frame, but it keeps wanting to pop out and mess the whole thing up.

After you finally get the Crosman Auto-Reset target all put together it still has problems. For one, the targets are extremely small. So unless you’re shooting it from under 20 feet, it’s near impossible to hit. And even when you do hit, unless you hit one of the targets dead center, it most likely won’t go down.

The target is also supposed to stop the BB and catch it in the net so you can reuse it. That’s also not true. The net is so tight that the BB hits the net and bounces right back out. So basically don’t be expecting for it to contain your BBs.

To pile more negative feedback on top, it breaks. If you miss the target and hit the plastic frame it’ll chip off. Even with low FPS (Feet Per Second) guns it still chipped the plastic if it hit it.

The Crosman Auto-Reset target isn’t all bad, though. You really can’t beat the price at the $10-$15 it goes for. Plus, when you actually do knock a target down, the reset works perfectly. If you want a cheap target that you can just fool around with on a rainy day, or even if you have a accurate rifle that you want to shoot at close range, this could fit the bill.

So, in closing, the Auto-Reset airsoft target from Crosman is far from perfect. But you have to remember that it’s only $10 or so.  If you’re looking to save ammo by reusing caught BBs, then stay away from this target, but if you just want a cheap alternative to a paper target I wouldn’t write this one off.