Gen X Global Stealth Paintball/Airsoft Mask Review

The Gen X Global Stealth mask is great for both paintball and airsoft, giving your face protection from BBs and paintballs. It’s made mostly from durable, flexible plastic with the exception of foam around the inside of the lenses and the adjustable strap in the back.

The Gen X Global Stealth mask has a great fit. As mentioned before, there’s a adjustable strap on the back of the mask that you can easily pull tighter or looser. And the plastic that the mask is made of is flexible; this doesn’t only cushion the shock from BBs and paintballs, but it also flexes to the contours of your head, making for a nice and snug fit. There’s also a small line of foam padding outlining the inside of the lenses, boosting the comfort level tremendously. The foam also doesn’t scratch against your skin like other masks with inner foam lining, which can be extremely uncomfortable, especially so when you start to sweat.

As you can see in the picture above, the Stealth mask also has plenty of little slots for air to get through. This is a big up-side for airsoft/paintball skirmishes when you’re constantly on the move and needing to suck down a lot of air.

The visor that comes with the Stealth mask is removable. This is great for transitioning between sunny outdoor shooting and indoor or CQB where you have to be as low-profile as possible. However, it is a little tricky to get on and off. There’s two little rods (one on either side) of the visor that you must fit into two holes on either side of the mask. There’s also four little hook-type parts that you have to align into vents in the top of the mask. To snap the mask back on you must align all four hooks and both rods into their places which is easier said than done.

A huge down-side is that it’s almost impossible to shoot rifles with the mask on. The problem is that that mask interferes with aiming down the sight, basically forcing you to either hip-fire or hold the rifle way out in front of you with the butt on your chest while trying to line up the sights. Although, you’re going to have this problem with just about any mask and you can still use pistols effectively. This problem also only applies to airsoft rifles, since you don’t have to use the traditional aiming method with paintball guns.

Another down-side is that the mask doesn’t cover your entire head. With the exception of your ears, the side and back of your head are still completely exposed. However, you’re still going to have this issue with any other mask because the only thing that covers your entire head are helmets, which can often cost upwards of $100.

The durability of the Stealth mask is exceptional. Even when shot from ten feet away with a 325FPS airsoft pistol it doesn’t chip or break, even if shot in the lens and slots. And even if a BB or paintball managed to chip or crack the lens, it’s easily replaceable. The lens can come on and off by pressing a couple points.

Fogging doesn’t seem to be a major issue with the Gen X Global Stealth mask. From time to time you may have a little bit of fogging up, mostly if it’s cold out, but for the most part the lens stays clear.

In a wrap, for the 10-$20 the Gen X Global Stealth runs, it’s a solid mask. I wouldn’t recommend this to airsoft players, just because the major issue of not being able to look down the sights on rifles, but if you’re planning to use it for paintball or if you’re going to use a pistol you should be fine.

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Umarex Tactical Force Combat CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Umarex Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back) airsoft pistol. It’s mostly made of metal, with the exception of the grip, and in many ways resembles a Glock. It requires standard 12 gram CO2 cartridges to operate.

The Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back), as mentioned before, meaning that the slide jolts backwards every time you pull the trigger, just like a real gun. However, the Combat’s slide only blows-back about 3/4 of an inch, making it look and feel less realistic. It’s also a little clunky, meaning that the slide doesn’t blow back in a single, smooth motion; it’s almost feels like the slide is shuttering back and forth. This not only makes the gun feel sluggish, it makes more difficult to keep your sights on target when you’re shooting.

GBB’s are known for their ability to “shoot as fast as you can pull the trigger”, but the Tactical Force Combat can easily malfunction when being shot too fast. Often times it will dry fire and then fire two BBs on your next shot if you shoot too rapidly. This isn’t a huge deal, it just forces you to slow down and take your time, which is usually a good thing anyway. However, it’s still a hassle for the times that it’s necessary to put BBs down range at a fast pace.

The Combat also isn’t one of the more accurate pistols out there. At 15-20ft with .20 gram BBs it can hit a 12-inch Gel Trap with decent consistency. However, at ranges over 25 feet, the BB starts to sink and is very inaccurate.

The sights are both good and bad. The front sight consists of a little white rod stuck through a standard black blade front sight, giving you a sort of white-dot sight. The back sights are made of a little bent green rod that is also stuck through a standard back sight, giving you a sort of green-dot sight. The contrast of green on white dots makes aiming and acquiring targets easy and fast. However, if you looked at the sights from the side, the green and white rods stick all the way through the standard sights, popping out the other side, making them look sloppy. But this is only a cosmetic issue, and doesn’t effect performance.

The Combat boosts a impressive 400FPS (Feet Per Second) with .12 gram BBs, and averages between 350 and 380FPS with .20 gram BBs, depending on how new the CO2 cartridge is. Although .12 gram BBs have higher velocity, I’d recommend only using .20 gram BBs because they’re much more accurate.

Through all the downsides, the Combat gets extremely good shots-per-CO2. The blow-back starts wearing down after about 8-10 magazines and the slide stops being blown back far enough for the slide lock to catch, but it still shoots BBs consistently up until 14-16 magazines. This is great if you’re planning on using it in a airsoft war, minimizing downtime.

To put the CO2 cartridge into the gun you simply press a button on the bottom of the gun, directly behind the magazine, which releases the part of the grip, revealing a small compartment. From there, you fit the cartridge into the compartment and screw it in.

The magazine is just like any other GBB magazine. There’s a little metal lever on the side of the magazine that you pull down to the bottom and lock in place. Once locked in place, you pour BBs into a small hole near the bottom of the magazine and then unlock the metal piece, putting tension on the BBs. The magazine holds 15 rounds and is full metal, making it both durable and relatively high-capacity.

One of the more notable issues it the safety. Instead of simply sliding the switch back and forth, in order switch between “fire” and “safe” you must push the switch inwards and then back/forward. It’s very difficult to do this with one finger, forcing you to hold the gun in one hand while trying to manipulate the safety with the other. However, after switching between fire and safe multiple times, it starts to loosen up.

The last thing worth noting is some of the little details. On the trigger itself there’s a mock safety, it looks like a smaller trigger coming out of the normal trigger, which on a real gun you press down along with the trigger to fire; although it doesn’t do anything on this gun, and is just for show. Another cool feature is the slide lock. As soon as you’ve discharged the last round, the slide stays back, indicating you’ve run out of ammo.

In a wrap, the Tactical Force Combat pistol has a lot of issues, but also has potential. It’s great for CQB, but fails to stay consistent at long ranges. It also has a large magazine, and features very good shots-per-cartridge. The blow-back is a neat feature, but ultimately reduces accuracy. It’s really not a bad gun, but just not one of the best.

BattleAxe M4/M16 Dual Magazine Airsoft Connector Review

The BattleAxe Dual Magazine Connector is designed to fit almost any M4 or M16 airsoft magazine, making reloading times faster and helping to conserve space.

Each of the BattleAxe Connectors (each pack comes with two of them, as you can see in the picture above) is made up of 4 pieces: a large plastic buckle in the front, a smaller plastic piece in the back, a long screw that connects the two plastic pieces and also runs in between the two magazines, and finally the olive-drab strip of fabric that holds the magazines in place.

The whole connector is cheaply made, but in particular the olive-drab straps are very thin and the ends fray very easily. Right out of the package all four of the ends weren’t properly tied, and were starting to fray. A simple solution here is to, as soon as you get the connector, take a couple pieces of duct-tape and sandwich about 1 inch of the end of the strap between it. This will help keep it from fraying and make it a little more durable.

How the connector works is each of the magazines go in between the screw that runs down the middle and the olive-drab strap on either side. You then pull the strap tight and tighten the screw in the back to give it added stability. However, some M4 and M16 magazines might be too wide to fit in between the plastic piece in the front and the plastic piece in the back. In most cases you can just loosen the screw until the two plastic pieces are far enough away from each other for the magazine to fit in between. But, in other cases, you might need to purchase a longer screw.

The last issue worth noting is that the magazines do start to slide up/down after extended use, but this is something you just have to live with because all magazine connectors are going to have the same problem, more or less.

Through all the down-sides, the BattleAxe magazine connector isn’t all bad. The reloading time is just about the same with AEGs because you still have to wind up the magazine, you can’t just pop it in and start shooting. But, it works very well for spring guns that magazines you don’t have to wind up. And it’s also great for saving space, keeping the extra magazine on the gun itself instead of having to keep it on you body.

Although, BattleAxe says that their magazine connector is just as good as any metal magazine connector, which I can’t say is true because you don’t have fraying/durability problems with the metal connectors as much as you do with this fabric and plastic one.

In closing, the BattleAxe M4/M16 Dual Magazine Airsoft Connector isn’t all bad. It certainly has some quality issues, but it’s cheaper and lighter than the metal connectors. And as long as you don’t expect too much, the BattleAxe magazine connector might be all you need.

Also note that it does not come with the two magazines. Unless whoever you’re buying from specifically says otherwise, all you get are the two connectors; you need your own two magazines to use in partnership with the connectors.

Rothco Outdoorsman Rucksack Review

The Rothco Outdoorsman Rucksack is a somewhat basic rucksack with multiple pockets, padded adjustable shoulder straps and a waist-strap for added support.

The Outdoorsman Rucksack is made almost completely of thin canvas material, with the exception of the straps and plastic buckles, which makes it light, but also a little less durable. It’s not delicate by any means, you can load quite a bit of weight into it without it faltering (I loaded my personal one up with 20lbs. worth of airsoft equipment and it didn’t seem to have any problems). Although, there’s a draw string underneath the flap at the top of the rucksack that you pull to close up the main compartment, and if you pull it to hard, it will start tearing into the fabric and cause it to fray.

The Outdoorsman Rucksack has 4 compartments: a main one which basically makes up the whole rucksack, two smaller side pockets on either side, and one pocket right on the front of the rucksack. Unless you’re carrying a single, large item, the big main pocket is kind of a waste. Because the main compartment is literally just a big empty pocket, with no kind of sorting or smaller compartments inside it. So if you want to put a bunch of smaller things in there (duct-tape, airsoft BBs, books, food, whatever), they get all mixed up and smashed. A solution to this is to get a bunch of smaller bags/backpacks  and place the smaller items in them, then put the bags into the big compartment. And the other 3 pockets aren’t even that big, nor do they have any type of sub-pockets, either.

Another thing to note is that rucksacks and backpacks are different. A backpack holds its shape and stays high up on your back, they also have a bunch of smaller pockets to store little items in. But a rucksack, like the Outdoorsman, is more or less a fabric bag that has no shape and hangs low on your back unless you put a large object into it to give it some shape. That’s why rucksacks are meant for holding bigger items like sleeping bags or wood (that’s why the Outdoorsman has that big unorganized compartment that I mentioned). Rucksacks aren’t bad, they’re just meant for different purposes then backpacks. So, if you’re thinking about buying the Outdoorsman Rucksack, just make sure you actually do want a rucksack and not a backpack.

Although, the large amount that the Outdoorsman Rucksack provides does come in handy. To give you an idea how much just the one big compartment will hold, deflated, the Intex Explorer 200 Inflatable Boat will fit with plenty of room to spare. Plus, you can stash another few small items in the other 3 pockets.

All in all, the Outdoorsman is a fairly good rucksack. As long as you’re sure you want a rucksack, it’s durable and can hold a load of weight. The waist-strap and adjustable shoulder straps also let it fit very well. For the price of $15-$25, you really can’t go wrong.

How to Make a Airsoft Silencer/Suppressor

Silencers/Suppressors really don’t silence or suppress anything in airsoft, they’re mainly for looks, although they increase accuracy. This post will show you how to make a simple airsoft silencer/suppressor from around the house items. In order for this silencer/suppressor to work, you need to put it on a airsoft gun that has a long-ish safety tip that your silencer can fit over, like this:

This is what you need:

  • A cardboard paper towel roll
  • Foam pipe instillation (1/2 inch diameter is fits the average gun, but you can buy 3/4 inch and up, depending on how large your orange safety tip is. It’s better to end up with a loose fitting one than one that won’t fit at all)
  • Tape (duct tape is best)
  • Bright orange tape (again, orange duct tape is best)
  • Spray paint (it’s up to you what color you want your silencer; black is standard, but you can make it match the color of your gun, or you can use a fun color, or OD Green looks pretty cool)
  • Cutting tools (to cut your paper towel roll, the instillation, and the tape)

Step 1 – The first thing you do is take your paper towel roll and the pipe instillation and cut them both to a length of 8in. You can make them shorter for CQB, but just make sure they’re the same size (also, save any piece of cardboard paper towel roll that you cut off to use later):

Step 2 – Next, fit the pipe instillation into the cardboard roll; it should be a snug fit:

Step 3- Now tape both ends up with tape so the pipe instillation won’t come out. Tape one end with the normal duct tape and tape the other with the bright orange (just make sure that you don’t cover up the hole of the pipe instillation):

Step 4 – Now all that’s left is to spray paint the whole thing. Just do not paint over the orange duct tape; this with serve as a safety tip (it’s illegal to have a airsoft gun without a bright orange tip on the end of it):

Step 5 – Now simply slide your silencer/suppressor over the orange safety tip on your gun. If it’s loose then you can take the little piece of cardboard roll that you saved earlier and cut it so you can open it up. Then roll it as tight as you can and glue it to the inside of the silencer. What this will do is make a smaller hole for your tip to fit in. This is what it should look like when it’s on your gun:

Like I said, it doesn’t silence or suppress, but it will increase the accuracy and look really cool. If you have problems with the silencer falling off then you can take the extra piece of cardboard and make the suppressor hole smaller, as explained above. Or, if you know you want the silencer on your gun for a while, you could even glue or tape the silencer onto your gun, although the cardboard trick should keep the silencer in place.

Please give all credit for this project to SirBuffaloSushi and AirsofterUnited.wordpress.com