Gen X Global Stealth Paintball/Airsoft Mask Review

The Gen X Global Stealth mask is great for both paintball and airsoft, giving your face protection from BBs and paintballs. It’s made mostly from durable, flexible plastic with the exception of foam around the inside of the lenses and the adjustable strap in the back.

The Gen X Global Stealth mask has a great fit. As mentioned before, there’s a adjustable strap on the back of the mask that you can easily pull tighter or looser. And the plastic that the mask is made of is flexible; this doesn’t only cushion the shock from BBs and paintballs, but it also flexes to the contours of your head, making for a nice and snug fit. There’s also a small line of foam padding outlining the inside of the lenses, boosting the comfort level tremendously. The foam also doesn’t scratch against your skin like other masks with inner foam lining, which can be extremely uncomfortable, especially so when you start to sweat.

As you can see in the picture above, the Stealth mask also has plenty of little slots for air to get through. This is a big up-side for airsoft/paintball skirmishes when you’re constantly on the move and needing to suck down a lot of air.

The visor that comes with the Stealth mask is removable. This is great for transitioning between sunny outdoor shooting and indoor or CQB where you have to be as low-profile as possible. However, it is a little tricky to get on and off. There’s two little rods (one on either side) of the visor that you must fit into two holes on either side of the mask. There’s also four little hook-type parts that you have to align into vents in the top of the mask. To snap the mask back on you must align all four hooks and both rods into their places which is easier said than done.

A huge down-side is that it’s almost impossible to shoot rifles with the mask on. The problem is that that mask interferes with aiming down the sight, basically forcing you to either hip-fire or hold the rifle way out in front of you with the butt on your chest while trying to line up the sights. Although, you’re going to have this problem with just about any mask and you can still use pistols effectively. This problem also only applies to airsoft rifles, since you don’t have to use the traditional aiming method with paintball guns.

Another down-side is that the mask doesn’t cover your entire head. With the exception of your ears, the side and back of your head are still completely exposed. However, you’re still going to have this issue with any other mask because the only thing that covers your entire head are helmets, which can often cost upwards of $100.

The durability of the Stealth mask is exceptional. Even when shot from ten feet away with a 325FPS airsoft pistol it doesn’t chip or break, even if shot in the lens and slots. And even if a BB or paintball managed to chip or crack the lens, it’s easily replaceable. The lens can come on and off by pressing a couple points.

Fogging doesn’t seem to be a major issue with the Gen X Global Stealth mask. From time to time you may have a little bit of fogging up, mostly if it’s cold out, but for the most part the lens stays clear.

In a wrap, for the 10-$20 the Gen X Global Stealth runs, it’s a solid mask. I wouldn’t recommend this to airsoft players, just because the major issue of not being able to look down the sights on rifles, but if you’re planning to use it for paintball or if you’re going to use a pistol you should be fine.

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UTG Blister Airsoft Speedloader Review

Airsoft speedloaders reduce reloading time by pushing multiple BBs into the magazine with a single press of a button.

Operating the UTG Blister speedloader is pretty simple: First you fill the speedloader up with BBs. You then place the small cylinder shaped piece, located at the bottom of the speedloader, into where you’d normally insert the BBs into your airsoft rifle magazine. From there, you press a circular button, located near the top of the speedloader, which releases the long plastic piece that you can see coming out of the top of the loader in the picture above. Finally, you simply push the long arm piece downwards, and it will push BBs into the magazine.

The Blister speedloader holds about 115 BBs and ejects 4 BBs with every push of the arm. It actually does reduce reloading time quite substantially, oppose to manually reloading one BB at a time by hand.

It’s made entirely of plastic, but can withstand drops on soft surfaces.

The Blister speedloader comes with pistol magazine adapter. It’s just a small plastic piece that snaps onto the end of the speedloader and helps the speedloader stay flush against bulky spring pistol magazines while you pump BBs into it.

In a wrap, the UTG Blister speedloader is a vital piece of equipment for the 3-$5 it costs, especially if you play actual airsoft skirmishes. It cuts down loading time and keeps you in the game.

Umarex Tactical Force Combat CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Umarex Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back) airsoft pistol. It’s mostly made of metal, with the exception of the grip, and in many ways resembles a Glock. It requires standard 12 gram CO2 cartridges to operate.

The Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back), as mentioned before, meaning that the slide jolts backwards every time you pull the trigger, just like a real gun. However, the Combat’s slide only blows-back about 3/4 of an inch, making it look and feel less realistic. It’s also a little clunky, meaning that the slide doesn’t blow back in a single, smooth motion; it’s almost feels like the slide is shuttering back and forth. This not only makes the gun feel sluggish, it makes more difficult to keep your sights on target when you’re shooting.

GBB’s are known for their ability to “shoot as fast as you can pull the trigger”, but the Tactical Force Combat can easily malfunction when being shot too fast. Often times it will dry fire and then fire two BBs on your next shot if you shoot too rapidly. This isn’t a huge deal, it just forces you to slow down and take your time, which is usually a good thing anyway. However, it’s still a hassle for the times that it’s necessary to put BBs down range at a fast pace.

The Combat also isn’t one of the more accurate pistols out there. At 15-20ft with .20 gram BBs it can hit a 12-inch Gel Trap with decent consistency. However, at ranges over 25 feet, the BB starts to sink and is very inaccurate.

The sights are both good and bad. The front sight consists of a little white rod stuck through a standard black blade front sight, giving you a sort of white-dot sight. The back sights are made of a little bent green rod that is also stuck through a standard back sight, giving you a sort of green-dot sight. The contrast of green on white dots makes aiming and acquiring targets easy and fast. However, if you looked at the sights from the side, the green and white rods stick all the way through the standard sights, popping out the other side, making them look sloppy. But this is only a cosmetic issue, and doesn’t effect performance.

The Combat boosts a impressive 400FPS (Feet Per Second) with .12 gram BBs, and averages between 350 and 380FPS with .20 gram BBs, depending on how new the CO2 cartridge is. Although .12 gram BBs have higher velocity, I’d recommend only using .20 gram BBs because they’re much more accurate.

Through all the downsides, the Combat gets extremely good shots-per-CO2. The blow-back starts wearing down after about 8-10 magazines and the slide stops being blown back far enough for the slide lock to catch, but it still shoots BBs consistently up until 14-16 magazines. This is great if you’re planning on using it in a airsoft war, minimizing downtime.

To put the CO2 cartridge into the gun you simply press a button on the bottom of the gun, directly behind the magazine, which releases the part of the grip, revealing a small compartment. From there, you fit the cartridge into the compartment and screw it in.

The magazine is just like any other GBB magazine. There’s a little metal lever on the side of the magazine that you pull down to the bottom and lock in place. Once locked in place, you pour BBs into a small hole near the bottom of the magazine and then unlock the metal piece, putting tension on the BBs. The magazine holds 15 rounds and is full metal, making it both durable and relatively high-capacity.

One of the more notable issues it the safety. Instead of simply sliding the switch back and forth, in order switch between “fire” and “safe” you must push the switch inwards and then back/forward. It’s very difficult to do this with one finger, forcing you to hold the gun in one hand while trying to manipulate the safety with the other. However, after switching between fire and safe multiple times, it starts to loosen up.

The last thing worth noting is some of the little details. On the trigger itself there’s a mock safety, it looks like a smaller trigger coming out of the normal trigger, which on a real gun you press down along with the trigger to fire; although it doesn’t do anything on this gun, and is just for show. Another cool feature is the slide lock. As soon as you’ve discharged the last round, the slide stays back, indicating you’ve run out of ammo.

In a wrap, the Tactical Force Combat pistol has a lot of issues, but also has potential. It’s great for CQB, but fails to stay consistent at long ranges. It also has a large magazine, and features very good shots-per-cartridge. The blow-back is a neat feature, but ultimately reduces accuracy. It’s really not a bad gun, but just not one of the best.

DBoys M4/M16 Airsoft 500rd Extended Magazine Review

The DBoys 500-round Extended Magazine fits onto most M4 and M16 airsoft AEGs. It’s an upgrade from the average 300-round magazines that come with the average M4/M16 AEG, giving you a 66% (or 200 BB) increase in BB capacity.

The DBoys Extended Magazine works just like any other AEG magazine. You load the BBs into a little plastic sliding door on the top of the magazine, filling up a large chamber. You then slide the little door shut and insert the magazine into your gun. From there you wind a wheel on the bottom of magazine (you can see the wheel in the picture above, at the bottom of the magazine, in the bottom right corner) until it gets hard to turn and starts to make a distinct clicking noise.

Having 500 rounds is great because you can just keep shooting without having to reload. However, about half way through the magazine, BBs will stop feeding and your gun will start to dry-fire. When this happens you need to wind the wheel on the bottom back up again. It’s not a huge deal, but it can be a chore if you’re in a actual airsoft skirmish and you have to stop to wind your magazine back up, especially when the whole point of a extended mag is to not have to stop to reload.

The DBoys Extended Magazine also claims to work with M4s and M16s from JG, AGM, DBoys, Classic Army and Echo 1, but that’s not entirely true. With my personal JG M4 2010 Upgraded Version I have to wiggle the magazine back and forth to get it to slide into my receiver and then forcefully slam the bottom of the magazine with the palm of my hand to get it to click into place (kind of like what your avatar does on Call of Duty: Black Ops when you close the top of the M60 after reloading it). The problem is that the magazine doesn’t go with the slight turn that M4 receivers have, making the back of the magazine scrape up against the M4’s receiver. Although slamming the bottom of the magazine does make it click into place and allows it to work normally, it makes reloading much slower and also causes some cosmetic damage to the magazine as well as inside receiver.

The magazine is very durable, however. It’s made completely of metal, excluding the wheel on the bottom, the plastic door on the top and a couple other little pieces. Even after upwards of 20 times of slamming it into my M4 it still works fine.

The last thing worth noting is that the little plastic sliding door that keeps the BBs from falling out of the storage chamber is very loose. This means that if you tip the magazine forward, unless it’s already inserted into your gun, the door will slide open, letting BBs fall all over the ground. Therefore, keeping spare magazines outside the gun (in a vest, backpack, etc.) is not a good idea without taping over the door first. However, this isn’t a huge problem because, being an already extended magazine, you may not need a spare.

In a wrap, the DBoys Extended Magazine is great for extended shooting. Even though you have to stop about half way through the magazine to re-wind it, it still beats having to carry a whole other magazine with you. And also just keep in mind that you might have to put some effort into getting the magazine into your gun.

Also note that this attachment is for AEGs (Automatic Electric Guns) only. It won’t work with spring rifles.