Stinger P9T Airsoft Gun Review

The Stinger P9T is a updated version of Crosman’s legendary Stinger P9. Updates include a updated safety, a larger profile, and a larger 15 round magazine.

One of the bigger updates was to the magazine. The Stinger P9T can hold 15 rounds, oppose to the Stinger P9’s 12. But a huge downside it that it no longer has a reservoir. This is a big deal if you plan to use it in airsoft fights. Also, the magazine’s bigger than the old one, so you can’t even use old P9 magazines.

The safety is located very close to the back of the gun so that it’s hard to reach. You have to pretty much hold the gun with your weak hand and then flip the safety forwards or backwards with your strong hand to effectively work it. I don’t know why Crosman decided to do that; probably so that kids with small hands can operate it better. It’s also reversed, meaning that forward is safety and back is fire. This is a design flaw because when you shove it into a holster, sometimes the holster catches it and it switches it to fire.

The old Stinger P9 was known for it’s smooth slide and easy trigger pull, but the Stinger P9T just isn’t the same. When you pull the slide back to cock it it feels like you’re grinding metal on metal. Also, the slide only pulls back about a inch, making it feel like you didn’t cock it all the way. The trigger pull is not for the weak, either. You have to really squeeze it to make it fire. This heavy trigger pull really slows you down when you’re trying to put some plastic down range.

One thing that didn’t change is the stunning accuracy. With .25 gram BBs you can hit a 12 inch gel target from well over 40 feet away. If the Stinger P9 and the Stinger P9T went head-to-head, I’d actually have to say that the Stinger P9T is a little bit more accurate.

Another good thing about the Stinger P9T is that it has a lot more metal than the old Stinger P9. The trigger is metal, along with several internal pieces that are visible with the clear plastic colored models.

With most of the Stinger P9T’s you get a holster included. But the holster is terrible. The old holsters that came with the Stinger P9’s had a Velcro strap on the back so that you could easily take it on and off. It also had a snap thing that you could take the strap that secures your gun into the holster off with, and you could also undo a clip and get the strap off that way. These new holsters just have a loop on the back to put your belt through, meaning you have to undo your whole belt to get it on and off. Also the only thing that keeps the gun securing strap in place is a narrow strip of Velcro.

The last thing that you’ll notice about the Stinger P9T is it’s weight. It is really heavy; unloaded it weighs close to 1-1/2 pounds! This is good and bad. On the one hand it feels very realistic and solid, but on the other it might start to wear on you after a hour or two of shooting.

Through all the down sides, the Stinger P9T can be a good side arm. In my mind, it doesn’t quite stack up to the Stinger P9, although the accuracy is actually a little better. If you make sure to use .25 gram BBs, buy a better holster, and possibly buy some extra magazines, it could make a pretty good spring pistol.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 275
Accuracy: Great
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .25 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Crosman

Video Review:

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Stinger P311 Airsoft Gun Review

The Stinger P311 airsoft gun is a look-alike of the famous Colt 1911; from the block iron sights, to the simple look of the gun. At only $10-$20 (depending on where you buy it), this pistol also packs a punch.

One of the cool features of the Stinger P311 is the hammer. Most airsoft guns don’t have hammers, but lately Crosman (the maker of this gun) has been incorporating them into their pistols, adding to the realism. When you pull the slide back the hammer gets cocked back also, just like a real gun. You can manually pull back the hammer, too, and it’ll just snap back in place when you pull the trigger; although it won’t fire if you do that, since you have to pull the slide back to get it loaded. So, really, the whole point of the hammer is just decoration.

This pistol also packs a punch, for what it’s worth. It shoots 325 FPS, which is just about as high as it goes with spring pistols (without modifying it, that is).

A problem, though, with the Stinger P311 is the hop-up is nonadjustable, which means you’re stuck with however tight it was wound in the factory. Basically, at ranges over 30 feet, the Stinger P311 tends to shoot straight for about 20 feet, then take a dramatic turn either go left/right/up/down. You can’t really count this as a “con”, though, because almost every pistol is going to have the same problem, more or less. A solution to this problem is to shoot .20 gram BBs; they’re heavier than the regular .12 gram, so they tend to curve less. In really bad cases of curving BBs, you could even use .25 gram.

Another flaw is that it’s big, which would be a problem if you wanted to stick it in your pocket or something. But, this is another non issue, because you can get a holster for under $10. Besides, in the world of spring pistols, in order to have high FPS, it has to be a big gun.

For it’s price, the Stinger P311 has very nice workings. The slide pulls back quickly and cleanly, which results in shorter time between shots. The magazine also ejects out very quickly. With some airsoft pistols you have to push the magazine release while shaking the gun to get the magazine to fall out. The Stinger P311’s magazine springs out, which also makes for quick reload times. The flaws in the magazine are that is has no reserve, which means you might want to buy extra clips, due to not being able to refill from the magazine itself. Also, if you can’t do tactical reloads, because (if you take out the magazine while it still has BBs left in it) a couple BBs will fall out, all over the ground.

And, another part to think about is the safety. It’s located on the left side, just above the grip. It’s shaped like a triangle, and it pivots on one of the points. You flip it up and down to turn on and off the safety. Because of its weird design, not many people are used to it, so it doesn’t feel natural to turn off/on the safety. Some people like the design, and some people hate it, it’s up to your personal preference.

To conclude, the Stinger P311 is a great sidearm for both target shooting and airsoft matches. It boasts a high FPS, but is best used at ranges under 30-40 feet. Also, think about buying a holster and some heavier ammo along with this gun. Factoring in the price, performance, and overall utility of the Stinger P311, it’s one of my favorite spring pistols to use.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 325
Accuracy: Very accurate at 10-30 feet
Power: Spring (you must cock it back before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 12 BBs
Manufacture: Crosman

Video Review:

Mossberg M590 Airsoft Gun Review

The Mossberg M590 is a very versatile, powerful, light weight, combat shot gun. Soft-Air USA  took all these key features and turned it into a purebred airsoft shotgun.

The Mossberg M590 airsoft gun comes in three different styles: Full Stock, Collapsible Stock, and Pistol Grip (seen above). It’s great to have that kind of options, and every style fits each person differently. For example, if you’re a smaller kid and still like the stock, I’d recommend the collapsible stock. If you’re looking to use for CQB (Close Quarter Battle), I’d probably buy the pistol grip version. And finally, if you were looking for a true combat shotgun to own the battlefield with and hold nothing back, I’d purchase the full stock. There’s just so many different scenarios, so just think about which one fits you best and give that a try.

The Mossberg M590 is a true regulator. It shoots 355 FPS, and is pretty accurate (within five shots you can hit a squirrel from over 100 feet. I don’t recommend shooting it at any animal though, squirrels or otherwise). Obviously the pistol grip version might be less accurate though, due to it’s small format, just keep that in mind. As for different weights of BBs to use, I recommend .25 gram if you want a accurate shot, although .12 and .20 gram work fine if your goal is just to go all kamikaze on the other team. But if you’re looking to target shoot or be more conservative and accurate in a fight, I’d stick with .25 gram.

One of the reasons that the Mossberg M590 is so accurate is because it boasts the BAXS system. The BAXS system is a cousin of hop-up, and claims to be more accurate. Basically with BAXS, the BB doesn’t float/sink like hop-up does. In the case of the Mossberg M590, the BAXS system works like magic. Also, the BAXS is adjustable, to give the BB less/more backspin.

There are also two tricks with the Mossberg M590 that you can do. Just as a warning, though, these are called “tricks” for a reason, the Mossberg M590 isn’t suppose to be able to do this, so I’m not responsible for any damage to your gun by you trying this. The first trick is to hold down the trigger and never let it up and pump as fast as you can. That will make it virtually fully automatic. The second trick is to hold the gun so the barrel is pointing up and pump 3-5 times. Then when you shoot, it’ll shoot how ever many BBs you’ve pumped simultaneously, like buck shot. Just make sure to keep the barrel at no less than a 45 degree angle, otherwise the BBs will role out the muzzle. Like I’ve said, those are just a couple tricks you can do with the Mossberg M590 shotgun, they’re not actual features.

The magazine is the only weak-link in the Mossberg M590. It only holds 12 rounds, which might seem like a lot but at the rate you can pump and shoot, you’re out in no time. Most rifles hold 20+ rounds, so the 12 rounds is defiantly a down side. But, to make up for the 12 rounds, there’s a nice big reservoir that holds 180+ rounds. The thing about the reservoir is you pull the magazine spring  back past a hole that BBs fall in from and fill the chamber, just like any airsoft reservoir. The only thing about this one is that most springs can be pulled back and locked into place via notch, letting you be able to shake the magazine and get BBs into the chamber. This one however you must manually keep the spring back, because there’s no notch.

When you’re shooting, and think you’ve run out of ammo, you have to hold the gun upside-down and pump for the last two or three shots. You have to do this because the magazine spring doesn’t push the last few BBs up far enough, and if you were to just take the magazine straight out, a couple BBs would fall out. This isn’t a huge deal, just remember to pump the last couple shots in upside-down.

To conclude, the Mossberg M590 is a fast shooting, accurate shotgun. Great for both target shooting and a good backyard airsoft fight. While the magazine isn’t perfect, the power and versatility more than makes up. And it comes in many different styles, so make you get the right one to fit your needs. I definitely recommend this gun for the 20-$50 it costs (depending what style you get and where you get it from).

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 355
Accuracy: Can hit a person from over 100 feet
Power: Spring (you must cock it back before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .25 grams
Magazine Capacity: 12 BBs (with a 180 round reservoir)
Manufacture: Soft-Air USA

Video Review: