TSD 1911 Non-Blowback CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Colt 1911 is arguably the most world-widely used handgun of all time. Everyone from the US Army to the SAS use versions of the 1911. TSD took all of the 1911’s power, accuracy, and durability and incorporated them into their 1911 airsoft pistol.

The TSD 1911 has many of the features of a real Colt 1911, including a beaver-tail grip, block iron sights, and the caliber engraved on where the shells eject on a real 1911. It’s also made of mostly of metal, with the exceptions of the grips and the orange tip. Although it does have a hammer, it isn’t a working one; it is locked into place and is solely for decoration.

Since the TSD 1911 is CO2 (a version of Green Gas) powered, you can fire it as fast as you can pull the trigger. There’s no need to cock the slide back every time you shoot, like you do with spring pistols. This makes giving covering fire in a airsoft battle very easy. But, you run out of ammo quickly, so it might be a good idea to invest in extra magazines.

The magazines them selves hold 15 rounds and are fairly easy to reload. They’re made of some type of metal and are very durable. They’re skinny though, because it has to squeeze in next to the CO2.¬† To reload you have to pull the magazine spring down to the bottom where it locks into place, then you just push the BBs into a hole near the bottom, just like every other airsoft pistol.

The TSD 1911 takes 12 gram CO2 cartridges that go into a chamber that is located right behind the magazine, at the very back of the grip. To take the CO2 cartridges in and out the grip slides backward so that you can access it from the side.

Shooting wise, the TSD 1911 is very accurate with .20 gram BBs. The front sight has a white dot on it so you can aim much more accurately. However, it has a extremely heavy trigger pull, so it’s a good thing if you have a steady hand. You also start losing strength and accuracy when the CO2 cartridge gets low, but that’s to be expected.

It’s non-blowback which means that the slide doesn’t slide back when you shoot. This is both good and bad, because on the one hand blow-back looks awesome and makes it much more realistic, but on the other, blow-back is a CO2 drainer and you’d run out of CO2 in half the time that you normally would. You only get to shoot six or seven full magazines before your CO2 starts running out, anyway, so it’s probably better that it doesn’t have blow-back.

The last thing that you should take note of is the velocity that it shoots. With a new CO2 cartridge the TSD 1911 fires .20 gram BBs at a mind-blowing 400 FPS. Because of this, it might be to hot for friendly backyard airsoft skirmishes. If you wear heavy jackets or airsoft protection gear, you’ll probably be okay, but you just don’t want to be wearing a simple t-shirt or to get hit in the bare skin.

To wrap things up, TSD 1911 is a great sidearm that packs a hard punch. It’s very accurate and holds its own against heavy enemy fire. It also makes a great target shooting pistol. Just get ready to burn through some CO2!

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 400 (with .20 gram BBs)
Accuracy: Spectacular
Power: CO2
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: TSD Sports

Video Review:

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Galaxy G1 Airsoft Gun Review

The G1 by Galaxy is modeled after the Colt 25. It’s tiny build makes it ideal for being used as a pocket pistol or in CQB.

The first thing you’ll notice about the G1 is its size. It measures roughly 5-1/2 inches long and 3-3/4 inches high! This makes it perfect to slip into your pocket. Some people use it as a third gun (if you get captured in a airsoft battle and are forced to give up your primary and secondary, you can hide the G1 in your pocket and when your captors have their backs turned you can whip this out and try to make an escape). The G1’s size also makes it ideal for CQB (Close Quarter Battle) and maneuvering around corners and obstacles.

The G1 is probably best used as a “third gun” or a back up to your secondary because of its small, inaccurate design. It can shoot accurately at short ranges (15-20ft), but is inaccurate at anything more. Using .20 gram BBs will make it much more accurate, but it still is unpredictable at ranges over 30ft.

It shoots 240 FPS, which, for a pistol of this size, is pretty decent.

A down side is that it has no safety. This means, for safety reasons, you shouldn’t keep a round in the chamber until the moment you’re ready to shoot. The down side is, since you don’t already have a round in the chamber, you have to cock it back first. It takes about 3 seconds to cock the slide and get your sights on target, which is plenty of time for an enemy airsofter to see you and shoot you.

The magazine on the G1 only holds 8 rounds and finding spare mags are nearly impossible. But, again, the main purpose of the G1 is to fall back on and give you the chance to try to make a escape when your primary/secondary has been captured, ran out of ammo, or malfunctioned.

The sights are pretty bad, but like I said above, it should mainly only be used to buy time in a airsoft battle.

Though, the G1 is made almost entirely of metal (technically it’s called “Zinc Alloy”, but it feels a lot like metal) with the exceptions of the magazine and grips. This gives the gun a really good feel and makes it exceptionally durable.

The last thing that is worth noting is the workings. When you pull the slide back and let it slide back forward, sometimes a BB will get stuck in between the chamber and magazine and won’t allow the slide back forward again. You must then remove the magazine and cock it back a few more times to clear it. This is a big hassle to do when the whole point of the pistol is to buy time.

To wrap thing up, the Galaxy G1 is a okay little pistol, the main attraction being that it’s so small. I recommend that it only be used as a fall back in a airsoft war when your other two guns fail. As for target shooting, it’s a fun gun to shoot, but just know that you won’t be hitting the target a lot of the time. But, if you want a tiny little gun that has relatively good FPS and feels nice and solid, this might be the one for you.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 240
Accuracy: Good enough to buy some time
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 8 BBs
Manufacture: Galaxy

Stinger P9T Airsoft Gun Review

The Stinger P9T is a updated version of Crosman’s legendary Stinger P9. Updates include a updated safety, a larger profile, and a larger 15 round magazine.

One of the bigger updates was to the magazine. The Stinger P9T can hold 15 rounds, oppose to the Stinger P9’s 12. But a huge downside it that it no longer has a reservoir. This is a big deal if you plan to use it in airsoft fights. Also, the magazine’s bigger than the old one, so you can’t even use old P9 magazines.

The safety is located very close to the back of the gun so that it’s hard to reach. You have to pretty much hold the gun with your weak hand and then flip the safety forwards or backwards with your strong hand to effectively work it. I don’t know why Crosman decided to do that; probably so that kids with small hands can operate it better. It’s also reversed, meaning that forward is safety and back is fire. This is a design flaw because when you shove it into a holster, sometimes the holster catches it and it switches it to fire.

The old Stinger P9 was known for it’s smooth slide and easy trigger pull, but the Stinger P9T just isn’t the same. When you pull the slide back to cock it it feels like you’re grinding metal on metal. Also, the slide only pulls back about a inch, making it feel like you didn’t cock it all the way. The trigger pull is not for the weak, either. You have to really squeeze it to make it fire. This heavy trigger pull really slows you down when you’re trying to put some plastic down range.

One thing that didn’t change is the stunning accuracy. With .25 gram BBs you can hit a 12 inch gel target from well over 40 feet away. If the Stinger P9 and the Stinger P9T went head-to-head, I’d actually have to say that the Stinger P9T is a little bit more accurate.

Another good thing about the Stinger P9T is that it has a lot more metal than the old Stinger P9. The trigger is metal, along with several internal pieces that are visible with the clear plastic colored models.

With most of the Stinger P9T’s you get a holster included. But the holster is terrible. The old holsters that came with the Stinger P9’s had a Velcro strap on the back so that you could easily take it on and off. It also had a snap thing that you could take the strap that secures your gun into the holster off with, and you could also undo a clip and get the strap off that way. These new holsters just have a loop on the back to put your belt through, meaning you have to undo your whole belt to get it on and off. Also the only thing that keeps the gun securing strap in place is a narrow strip of Velcro.

The last thing that you’ll notice about the Stinger P9T is it’s weight. It is really heavy; unloaded it weighs close to 1-1/2 pounds! This is good and bad. On the one hand it feels very realistic and solid, but on the other it might start to wear on you after a hour or two of shooting.

Through all the down sides, the Stinger P9T can be a good side arm. In my mind, it doesn’t quite stack up to the Stinger P9, although the accuracy is actually a little better. If you make sure to use .25 gram BBs, buy a better holster, and possibly buy some extra magazines, it could make a pretty good spring pistol.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 275
Accuracy: Great
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .25 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Crosman

Video Review:

How to Make a Airsoft Grenade

Airsoft grenades that you can find on the internet are usually expensive and almost always require gas/CO2 to operate. This means that unless you’re ready to deal with the expense that come with real airsoft grenades, you’re stuck making one yourself. Making it yourself isn’t all bad, though. It’s cheaper and you don’t have to wait for shipping, and you can modify it for bigger/smaller explosions.

This is what you’ll need:

  • Small water bottle (the thinner the plastic the better. Some cheap 20oz Aquafina bottles are great)
  • .12 gram airsoft BBs
  • A couple tissues
  • Vinegar
  • Baking Soda

Step 1 – The first thing you want to do is fill your bottle up about half way with vinegar (maybe a little more than half way). Then pour about 30 airsoft BBs into the bottle. You can use more or less BBs depending on how many people you want to hit.

Step 2 – Take a tissue and lay it out flat. In the middle pour about 1oz of baking soda (the more baking soda, the bigger the boom, just make sure that your roll isn’t to fat to fit through the mouth of the bottle) then roll the tissue up, making a long straw type shape. Make sure to fold up both ends at some point during when you’re getting to the end of rolling it up, making sure that no baking soda will fall out the top or bottom.

Step 3 – Now when you’re ready to throw your grenade, drop the baking soda roll through the mouth of the bottle, screw the cap of the bottle on as tight as you can and then shake. You should feel the bottle getting bigger and bigger in your hand. When you think it’s about to blow, whip it at something solid near your targets. Pavement is ideal, but a wood structure or anything else is good. If you simply toss it on the ground it may not build enough pressure to explode; the best thing to do is whip it at something solid, as stated above. The thinner the plastic is on your bottle is the better chance you’ll have of a good explosion.

When the grenade goes off the sound is very loud (close to the sound of a gun shot). So, you may not want to use these at night or in the early morning. The bottle also gets completely shredded, so it’s pretty much a one-time use.

BBs fly within a 20-30ft radius. Depending on where you get hit it’ll sting a little bit.

Please give all credit for this project to SirBuffaloSushi and AirsofterUnited.wordpress.com

How to Make a Airsoft Mortar

Mortars are very common over in the Middle-East (among other places), not to mention very effective. Bringing the concept of the mortar to an airsoft field is outright destructive. Unfortunately no one makes airsoft mortars; which means you’re stuck making one yourself. Making it yourself isn’t all bad, though. By making it yourself it’s cheaper, if it needs maintenance you know how to fix it, and it can be plain fun.

This is what you need:

  • A plastic bottle (a small 20oz-ish bottle is perfect)
  • A 1-1/2ft long, 1/2in diameter PVC pipe (the diameter depends on how big the mouth on your bottle is; the PVC pipe just needs to fit snugly into the mouth of the bottle)
  • Electrical tape (or any kind of tape, for that matter; it just has to be able to be peeled off and on multiple times and still work)
  • A latex glove (like the ones doctors use; real thin and stretchable) (you can find ones like these at BJ’s or a automotive store)
  • Spray paint (It’s up to you what color to make your mortar; black is default, but OD Green looks awesome, or you can make it a fun color, it’s up to you)

Step 1 – Take your latex glove and cut a good sized square out of it (3in x 3in will do). Now take that latex square and stretch it over one end of your PVC pipe. Completely cover the hole on the one end. Stretch the latex until it’s close to breaking and tape it firmly in place. It should look something like this:

Step 2 – Slide your PVC pipe with the latex square taped onto it into the mouth of the bottle (latex side first). Slide it about 1/2 an inch into the bottle and then stop. With another piece of tape, secure the PVC pipe into the bottle by wrapping the tape very tightly around the mouth of the bottle, making a airtight seal. It should look like this:

Step 3 – Now all you have left to do is paint it. I recommend using a spray paint that’s meant for plastic, so it won’t peel off when you step on the bottle or peel the tape on and off. This is the final product (I painted mine in a dual-tone black/OD Green kind of thing):

How you shoot your mortar is you put airsoft BBs (7-10 of them) into the open end of the PVC pipe. Then you step on the the bottle with your foot. Stepping on the bottle will automatically raise the PVC pipe in the air a little bit. Put all your weight on the bottle and finally the latex will break and send a surge of air through the PVC pipe and project the BBs. Do not stomp on the bottle, just slowly put more and more weight on it until the latex snaps.

The only down side of this mortar is that to reload you have to unwrap the tape, pull out the PVC pipe, unwrap the other tap, pull off the popped latex, replace it with a new piece of latex, tape it up, put the bottle back on, and re-tape that again. Believe it or not, though, if you get a couple of teammates helping you, you can have it reloaded in about a minuet.

For accurate aiming you can even have a friend lift the PVC pipe up/down a little bit for greater/lesser distance. Although it looks pretty far from a real mortar, it fires just like one; all your BBs should rain down within a 10ft area. The mortar has a effective range of about 50ft. The BBs won’t hurt too bad, but you should be able to tell if you get hit. If you want to take your mortar to the next level (and make it look more like a real mortar), you can take a two sticks and tape them near the front of the PVC pipe (almost like a bipod).

Please give all credit for this project to SirBuffaloSushi and AirsofterUnited.wordpress.com

How to Make a Airsoft Claymore

The only airsoft claymores that you can find are over $100. So, unless you’re willing to shell out big bucks for a simple claymore, you’re stuck making one yourself. Making it yourself isn’t all bad, though. You can construct a decent airsoft claymore with some around-the-house items pretty easily. Plus, you know how it works if it ever needs maintenance.

This is what you need:

  • A cardboard box (it doesn’t need to be huge, but don’t make it too small)
  • Fishing line (or invisible thread)
  • Duct-tape
  • Some bendable wire (the wire needs to be manipulable, but sturdy enough so it won’t bend under some light weight; wire from a old clothing rack is perfect) (if you don’t have wire, then you can use a couple skinny sticks)
  • A mousetrap
  • Spray paint (OD Green or some type of Camouflage is best, but it’s to try to make it blend in with the environment, so if you live in the desert use brown and khaki, or for winter/snow use white or gray)
  • Cutting tools (to cut cardboard, string, and wire)

Step 1 – The first step is to prep your box. As stated above, you want a medium sized box, it also needs to be pretty deep. Take your box and cut the flaps off, so it looks like this:

Step 2 – After you’ve cut off the flaps, you can discard them. The next thing you want to do is take four pieces of wire (about 2 feet long) and poke them through the bottom of your box near each of the corners:

Step 3 – Now bend a little part of the wire that is poking up inside the box down and then pull it out the bottom of the box. Then bend the wire so it won’t come back up. Basically you want to make a hook-shaped thing, then pull the hook back through the bottom, leaving about a inch of cardboard left between where the wire initially went in and where the hook comes out (if you’re using sticks, you can skip this step):

Step 4 – So now you have the legs almost done. Now just put some Duct-tape over the inch of cardboard, ensuring it won’t tear causing the leg to come out (if you’re using sticks, then you’ll want to find some way to glue or tape your sticks to get them to stay in place. But, you want them to be able to swing back and forth) :

Step 5 – Now cut two vertical slits in the middle of the bottom of the box, about three inches long and four inches apart:

Step 6 – Take your mouse trap and tie multiple strands of fishing line/invisible thread and tie it to the part of the mouse trap that snaps down and would normally hit the mouse. Tape the other end of the string to bottom of the mouse trap. Make it long enough so if the mouse trap went off it would stop half way, like this (in this case I used yarn so you can see it. It really doesn’t matter what kind of string you use for this step, as long as it’s strong enough, because you’ll spray paint it anyway):

Step 7 – Now take your duct tape and cover the mouse-hitting thing, making a little sort of pocket:

Step 8 – Place the mouse trap (mouse-hitting side facing out of the box) between the slits you made in step 5. Tape the mouse trap down by threading a long piece of tape up through one slit, over part of the mouse trap, and back out the second slit. Make sure that the mouse trap will still fire half way, and that you didn’t accidentally tape the mouse-hitter thing down:

Step 9 – Next, take two pieces of wire (the size of the length between the front left to front right/back left to back right legs) and then bring both of the back legs forward past the front legs and connect a wire between them. Then connect the front legs. Use tape and string to lash the wire between the legs. So now the legs are crisscrossed, just like a real claymore:

Step 10 – Tie a 10ft piece of fishing line/invisible thread to the trigger part of the mouse trap (by “trigger” I mean the part the mouse steps on to set off the trap; sometimes it’s a cheese shaped piece of plastic, or sometimes it’s just a little piece of metal). Tie the other end to a 2ft tall piece of wire/stick. Then you can go ahead and spray paint the whole thing. As stated in the directions, you want a color that will blend into the environment that you’re going to use it in; the point isn’t to make it invisible, just not appear so obvious. This is what the finished product should look like (I made mine OD Green because I live in a sort of woody area with lots of Evergreen trees and bushes. The wire that has the string attached to the mouse trap is black. The image came out a little blurry, but the legs on the claymore are also OD Green):

How your claymore works is you stick it in the ground and stick the 2ft tall wire/stick that’s attached to the mouse trap about 9ft away, giving the line in between the wire and the mouse trap just enough slack that the claymore won’t go off on accident. Now set the mouse trap just like you normally would. Put 10 or so airsoft BBs on top of the duct tape pocket that you made on the mouse-hitter thing. Now your claymore is set. If someone bumps into the fishing line, the mouse trap will go off and stop abruptly half way, which will send the BBs sitting on top of the mouse trap flying into whoever hit the fishing line. If the BBs hit bare skin it’ll sting just a little bit, and if they hit fabric, you’ll feel them but they won’t hurt too bad.

The best way to use your claymore is in airsoft matches; put it around a corner where it’s hidden and when someone comes running past they’ll hit the fishing line and the claymore will get them. Your paint job camouflage will come in handy if you plant the claymore in high grass or brush.

Please give all credit for this project to SirBuffaloSushi and AirsofterUnited.wordpress.com

How to Make a Airsoft Silencer/Suppressor

Silencers/Suppressors really don’t silence or suppress anything in airsoft, they’re mainly for looks, although they increase accuracy. This post will show you how to make a simple airsoft silencer/suppressor from around the house items. In order for this silencer/suppressor to work, you need to put it on a airsoft gun that has a long-ish safety tip that your silencer can fit over, like this:

This is what you need:

  • A cardboard paper towel roll
  • Foam pipe instillation (1/2 inch diameter is fits the average gun, but you can buy 3/4 inch and up, depending on how large your orange safety tip is. It’s better to end up with a loose fitting one than one that won’t fit at all)
  • Tape (duct tape is best)
  • Bright orange tape (again, orange duct tape is best)
  • Spray paint (it’s up to you what color you want your silencer; black is standard, but you can make it match the color of your gun, or you can use a fun color, or OD Green looks pretty cool)
  • Cutting tools (to cut your paper towel roll, the instillation, and the tape)

Step 1 – The first thing you do is take your paper towel roll and the pipe instillation and cut them both to a length of 8in. You can make them shorter for CQB, but just make sure they’re the same size (also, save any piece of cardboard paper towel roll that you cut off to use later):

Step 2 – Next, fit the pipe instillation into the cardboard roll; it should be a snug fit:

Step 3- Now tape both ends up with tape so the pipe instillation won’t come out. Tape one end with the normal duct tape and tape the other with the bright orange (just make sure that you don’t cover up the hole of the pipe instillation):

Step 4 – Now all that’s left is to spray paint the whole thing. Just do not paint over the orange duct tape; this with serve as a safety tip (it’s illegal to have a airsoft gun without a bright orange tip on the end of it):

Step 5 – Now simply slide your silencer/suppressor over the orange safety tip on your gun. If it’s loose then you can take the little piece of cardboard roll that you saved earlier and cut it so you can open it up. Then roll it as tight as you can and glue it to the inside of the silencer. What this will do is make a smaller hole for your tip to fit in. This is what it should look like when it’s on your gun:

Like I said, it doesn’t silence or suppress, but it will increase the accuracy and look really cool. If you have problems with the silencer falling off then you can take the extra piece of cardboard and make the suppressor hole smaller, as explained above. Or, if you know you want the silencer on your gun for a while, you could even glue or tape the silencer onto your gun, although the cardboard trick should keep the silencer in place.

Please give all credit for this project to SirBuffaloSushi and AirsofterUnited.wordpress.com

Beretta 90two Airsoft Gun Review

The 90two airsoft pistol by Beretta is a look-a-like of the Beretta M9. It boasts 260FPS and a 15-round magazine, which is great, whether you’re target shooting or using it in airsoft battles.

The Beretta 90two is almost entirely plastic, with the exceptions of the barrel and a few internal pieces. Although, it feels pretty solid and can withstand a couple drops.

The workings are okay for the most part. The slide is a little sticky, though. And what I mean by that is that when you cock it, it doesn’t make a satisfying click like most airsoft pistols do when you cock it back. So you don’t know if you got a BB in the chamber or not. Also, the magazine release is slow. When you hit the button to release the magazine, you have to shake the gun up and down to get it to fall out. The hammer is also hit or miss. When you pull the hammer back manually, you have to pull the trigger 2-5 times to get it to snap back into place; it just makes the whole gun feel kind of unresponsive. Although, when you pull the whole slide back and that pushes the hammer down, when you fire it usually snaps into place the first time. The safety is even hard to switch; it’s so hard to switch, you may even need to use a butter knife to switch it between safe and fire a couple times to get it loosened up.

The really big issue with the Beretta 90two is the magazine. It’s holds 15 rounds which is great, but it’s prone to breaking. It’s extremely poorly designed. The bottom of the magazine sometimes slides forward when you slam the magazine into the gun, or in the heat of battle it sometimes slides forward too. The problem with this is that the bottom is the only thing holding the little spring that pushes the BBs up into the chamber in place. When the bottom slides out of place the magazine spring flies out, along with your BBs. The simple solution to this is to glue/tape the bottom of the magazine to the actual magazine so it won’t slide forward.

Also, if you’re planning to carry the 90two in a holster, just know that it’s pretty hard to draw. The problem is that the front sight gets caught on the holster, so you have to pinch the holster with one hand and pull the gun out with your other to efficiently draw it. This isn’t a huge issue, just don’t be expecting to whip it out and start shooting.

Some of the good things about the Beretta 90two is it’s accuracy and the price. The 90two features upgraded white dot sights, which helps tremendously for aiming. The relativity high FPS (for a spring pistol) of 260, combined with the upgraded sights makes for very accurate shooting at 20-40ft with .20 gram. .12 gram BBs fly farther, but are way less accurate, so I’d stick to .20 gram. And for only $15-$20 that the 90two goes for, it’s a pretty good gun.

To wrap things up, the Beretta 90two isn’t too bad a gun for $15 or $20; just remember that you get what you pay for. The 90two would do pretty well to someone that’s looking to target shoot, but may not match up to some of the other airsoft pistols in a skirmish. In the end, it’s a good sidearm for a novice to mid-level airsoft player on a tight budget; just know how to deal with some of the problems that come with a cheap airsoft gun.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 260
Accuracy: Accurate at 20-40ft
Power: Spring (you must cock it back before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Beretta

Crosman Gel Trap Airsoft Target Review

Depending on what type of airsoft gun you have, you go through a lot of BBs. The Crosman Gel Trap not only stops the BBs and is a great target, it catches them and drops them into a tray for you to reuse.

As far as the look of it goes, it’s much like a dartboard. This is useful because
you can also play two-player games, in addition to just trying to hit the bulls-eye.

The Crosman Gel Trap is about 12in wide and has a clip on the backside, so that you can hang it on a wall. You can also set it up on a table by lifting the target up from the tray, and inserting the legs of the target back into a slot in the middle of the tray. But, because the target is on the smaller side, it fills up fast, then you have to manually clear the target because it takes to long for all the BBs to fall into the tray.

It’s very durable, too. I’ve had mine for two years, and besides it getting a little less tacky and it chipping in a couple places, it’s held up very well. Although, getting grass stuck on the face of it is a fast way to ruin it. Also, the plastic around the gel part and the tray itself can get hit and chipped by higher FPS (Feet Per Second) guns; but that’s to be expected from any target.

Crosman claims that BBs hit the target and slowly drip down into the tray. For the most part this is true, although depending on the FPS of your gun, the BBs hit, stay for a few minuets, then suddenly drop into the tray. Either way, this target can save you thousands of BBs, and lots of money.

In a wrap, for the $9-$15 the Crosman Gel Trap costs, it’s well worth the money. I don’t really recommend anything over 300 FPS shoot this target, though, because they can damage the plastic on the target. Also know that this target is meant for airsoft guns, BB guns will damage the target.

Stinger P311 Airsoft Gun Review

The Stinger P311 airsoft gun is a look-alike of the famous Colt 1911; from the block iron sights, to the simple look of the gun. At only $10-$20 (depending on where you buy it), this pistol also packs a punch.

One of the cool features of the Stinger P311 is the hammer. Most airsoft guns don’t have hammers, but lately Crosman (the maker of this gun) has been incorporating them into their pistols, adding to the realism. When you pull the slide back the hammer gets cocked back also, just like a real gun. You can manually pull back the hammer, too, and it’ll just snap back in place when you pull the trigger; although it won’t fire if you do that, since you have to pull the slide back to get it loaded. So, really, the whole point of the hammer is just decoration.

This pistol also packs a punch, for what it’s worth. It shoots 325 FPS, which is just about as high as it goes with spring pistols (without modifying it, that is).

A problem, though, with the Stinger P311 is the hop-up is nonadjustable, which means you’re stuck with however tight it was wound in the factory. Basically, at ranges over 30 feet, the Stinger P311 tends to shoot straight for about 20 feet, then take a dramatic turn either go left/right/up/down. You can’t really count this as a “con”, though, because almost every pistol is going to have the same problem, more or less. A solution to this problem is to shoot .20 gram BBs; they’re heavier than the regular .12 gram, so they tend to curve less. In really bad cases of curving BBs, you could even use .25 gram.

Another flaw is that it’s big, which would be a problem if you wanted to stick it in your pocket or something. But, this is another non issue, because you can get a holster for under $10. Besides, in the world of spring pistols, in order to have high FPS, it has to be a big gun.

For it’s price, the Stinger P311 has very nice workings. The slide pulls back quickly and cleanly, which results in shorter time between shots. The magazine also ejects out very quickly. With some airsoft pistols you have to push the magazine release while shaking the gun to get the magazine to fall out. The Stinger P311’s magazine springs out, which also makes for quick reload times. The flaws in the magazine are that is has no reserve, which means you might want to buy extra clips, due to not being able to refill from the magazine itself. Also, if you can’t do tactical reloads, because (if you take out the magazine while it still has BBs left in it) a couple BBs will fall out, all over the ground.

And, another part to think about is the safety. It’s located on the left side, just above the grip. It’s shaped like a triangle, and it pivots on one of the points. You flip it up and down to turn on and off the safety. Because of its weird design, not many people are used to it, so it doesn’t feel natural to turn off/on the safety. Some people like the design, and some people hate it, it’s up to your personal preference.

To conclude, the Stinger P311 is a great sidearm for both target shooting and airsoft matches. It boasts a high FPS, but is best used at ranges under 30-40 feet. Also, think about buying a holster and some heavier ammo along with this gun. Factoring in the price, performance, and overall utility of the Stinger P311, it’s one of my favorite spring pistols to use.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 325
Accuracy: Very accurate at 10-30 feet
Power: Spring (you must cock it back before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 12 BBs
Manufacture: Crosman

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