NcSTAR Red-Dot Sight (With 4 Different Reticles) Review

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is a great multipurpose battery powered optic. With 4 different reticles, you can use it for a wide range of situations from pin-point long distant shots to Close Quarter Battle. It comes with an extra battery, a lens cover, a Allen Wrench, a small screw driver to open the battery compartment with, a cloth to clean the lens with, and a manual. It’s also available in black, camouflage, and silver.

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is really a lot smaller than it looks. It’s roughly three inches long, one and a half inches wide, and two inches tall. Its small size isn’t necessarily bad, though. Its low profile is great for CQB and also makes it lighter if you have an already heavy gun.

One of the biggest attractions is the 4 different reticles: a small crosshair, a regular dot, a circle within a circle, and another small crosshair with a circle around the center. You can easily change between them by turning a knob on the very back of the sight. Having 4 different reticles is great, like I said before, because of its versatility. If you need to make a pin-point sniper shot you can switch to the normal red-dot, but if you need to go into a building or a tight space, you can switch to the circle within a circle reticle.

There’s also 7 different brightness settings. 1 being for darker surroundings and 7 being for bright surroundings. You change the brightness by turning the big knob in the middle of the sight.

The reticle is projected onto the glass by a little window near the back of the sight. If you look at the sight backwards you can actually see a miniature version of the reticle with a light shining on it inside the little window. This means if you’re using the NcSTAR Red-Dot sight at nighttime, someone could spot you from the light inside the sight. This, however, is something you just have to live with because all red-dot sight are more or less going to have the same problem.

The NcSTAR Red-Dot sight easily mounts to any standard weaver/picatinny rail by unscrewing the bolts on the side with the included Allen Wrench and then tightening them back up once you have the sight positioned on your rail.

Adjusting the sight is also very easy. There’s a bolt on the top of the sight, and one on the side. You simply turn the bolt on the top right or left to make it the reticle aim higher or lower, and turn the bolt on the side left or right to make the reticle air more left or right. But, straight out of the box, it was already deadly accurate on my personal Jing Jong M4 airsoft rifle.

The last thing worth noting is the battery. It’s a CR2023 3-volt Micro Lithium Battery and can be accessed by unscrewing the very top of the brightness-selector knob. Like I said before; it comes with a spare, but they last quite a while so you might not even need it.

To wrap things up, the NcSTAR Red-Dot sight is one of the best out there. It’s small and low profile, but still gets the job done. And it’s very customizable and can easily adapt to what you want to use it for. You really can ask much more from a red-dot sight.

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JG M4 S-System Airsoft Gun Review (2010 Version)

The JG M4 airsoft rifle is one of the most popular airsoft AEGs on the market. It’s battery powered and has full and semi-automatic firing modes. It’s also almost completely metal making it feel sturdy and durable.

One of the first things you notice about the JG M4 is the Weaver rails. As you can see in the picture above, there’s a rail that runs along the whole top of the gun as well as one on the bottom. It also comes with two smaller rails that are meant for the sling mount, but you can place on either side of the hand guard and use for mounting accessories. The iron sights are also folding, so that you can have a unobstructed view of a scope or sight. It comes, like I mentioned, with sling mounts, too, that you can install and uninstall with a couple screws. And being built around the M4 design makes it compatible with most M16/M4 airsoft magazines and accessories.

You can also upgrade it internally. It comes with instructions on how to disassemble it so that you can easily upgrade springs, gears, etc.

The JG M4 shoots .20 gram BB’s at a blistering 420 Feet Per Second (542 FPS with .12 grams). That’s about as high as you can get from a AEG without modifying it. From 50 feet away you can shoot right through a Crosman Gel-Target. This makes target shooting a lot of fun, but it might hurt a little too much for a friendly backyard skirmish. Plus, most airsoft fields won’t allow guns over 400 FPS.

The accuracy is also very good. Right out of the box you can easily hit a person-sized target from over 90 feet away. You can also adjust the front sight, back sight, and the hop-up to make it even more accurate.

There are a lot of moving parts on the JG M4 which adds to the realism. When you pull back the charging handle a dirt-flap springs open and reveals a wheel to adjust the hop-up. And there’s also a “front aim assist” button on the right side of the gun that you can press in. On a real gun this would help unjam bullets,  but, on this airsoft version, it doesn’t do anything and is just for decoration.

The battery is really the only big problem with the gun. It’s 8.4v 1100mAh and takes about 4 hours to charge. But the main problem is getting the battery into the gun. The battery compartment is inside the hand guard where the Weaver rails are. To get to it, you turn two screws and the the lower half of the hand guard will fall open. But there’s only a little bit of space for the battery to fit into, and when you start to close the hand guard back up, the wires connecting the battery to the gun get caught in between the lower and upper half of the hand guard, making it impossible to close. It almost takes two people to keep the wires out of the way while trying to keep the battery from falling out.

But even when you do get the battery in, it drains very quickly. Within three or four magazines, you need to recharge again.

The magazines themselves are basically just like any other AEG magazine. You pour the BB’s into the top of the magazine and then wind a wheel on the very bottom to get the BB’s to feed into the gun. Although, they only hold 300 rounds, which isn’t a lot when you’re shooting on the fully-automatic setting. But, like I said before, the JG M4 is compatible with most M16/M4 magazines, so you can buy spares.

The last thing worth noting is the Rate of Fire. On the fully-automatic setting it honestly doesn’t shoot that fast (maybe about 500-600 RPM on a good day). It doesn’t shoot slow by any standard, but my $99 Crosman Pulse R76 out shoots it considerably.

Overall, the JG M4 S-System airsoft rifle is pretty nice AEG, with one of the highest velocities that you can get. It’s fully customizable with tons of Weaver rails, as well as upgradable internally. The ROF is fairly low, but the accuracy, velocity, and durable metal build more than make up for it.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 420 with .20 gram BB’s (542 with .12 gram)
Accuracy: Great
Power: Battery
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 300 BBs
Manufacture: Jing Gong

Walther Special Operations P99 Airsoft Gun Review

The Walther P99 is a very iconic gun used world-wide; from James Bond to the German police to the latest Modern Warfare game. The Walther P99 airsoft gun is obviously a replica of the real thing. It comes with a silencer, extra magazine, and a larger grip replacement.

The main thing people notice when they look at the Walther P99 airsoft gun is the silencer. It’s suppose to be a “mock” silencer that’s just for show, but there’s a noticeably quieter sound when you shoot with the silencer on oppose to off. The silencer is removable (it simply screws on and off) but when you take it off, there’s a one-inch long orange tip that doubles as the thing that the silencer screws onto. It looks absolutely terrible, but it doesn’t effect performance. Also, the silencer completely obstructs the iron sights, making aiming much harder.

The orange tip doubling as the thing that the silencer screws onto  is an all-out design flaw/shortcut that Umarex (the manufacturer of this gun) took because it’s much cheaper to produce this way. Not only does the tip look horrible when the silencer is taken off, but it’s also very weak because it’s only made of plastic. This causes the silencer to break right off the gun, taking the orange tip with it, if you are at all rough with it.

Even if you manage not to break your silencer, it makes the whole gun very inaccurate. Because the silencer isn’t properly anchored to the gun, if you even slightly bump it it will bend a little bit and send BBs flying in every-which direction.

With the silencer taken off, the Walther P99 airsoft pistol is pretty accurate with .20 gram BBs. Even in the wind, it can hit a 12 inch gel target from 30 feet away with good consistency. And the sights are exactly like the ones on the real P99 which adds to the realism.

The magazines that come with the Walther P99 are really good. They hold 15 rounds and have a 100 round reservoir. The reservoir makes reloading time much quicker, since you can reload right from the magazine itself. Although, they are made completely out of light plastic, which makes them less durable and feel cheap.

The larger grip that the Walther P99 comes with is great for people with large hands. To replace the normal sized grip with the bigger one all you have to do is remove a pin and the grip will come right off, then you can just push the other one right on and put the pin back in. The larger grip makes the whole grip much bigger, although it isn’t flush with the rest of the gun and looks kind of stupid with a considerable gap between the grip and the handle. It’s sturdy and does the job, though.

The safety is absolutely ridicules. It’s a tiny little half-circle that you have to pinch with your index finger and thumb and turn to select “fire” or “safe”. If you need to take the gun out and start shooting in a timely manner, which you usually have to do with sidearms, it takes over three extra seconds to hold the P99 in one hand and turn off the safety with the other. This wasted time can result in you being tagged in a airsoft skirmish.

The last thing that’s worth noting about the Walther P99 is a little red dot on the back of the gun that pops up when there’s a BB in the chamber and goes back down when there’s not. This kind of makes the gun look even more like a toy, but the red warning dot can be helpful if you just pick the gun up and don’t know if it’s loaded. Personally, I like this feature.

To wrap things up, the Walther P99 Special Operations airsoft pistol is a okay spring pistol. The silencer looks cool, but really doesn’t serve much purpose and is very easy to break. And the magazines are really the highlight of the whole gun. I would think of this gun more as “just for show” kind or gun (like a airsoft revolver); it truly doesn’t have much useability, but it’s unique and different. For the $20 that it costs, though, as long as you’re very gentle with the silencer, it’s worth the buy.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 300
Accuracy: Bad with the suppressor, Moderately accurate without it
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before every shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Umarex

TSD 1911 Non-Blowback CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Colt 1911 is arguably the most world-widely used handgun of all time. Everyone from the US Army to the SAS use versions of the 1911. TSD took all of the 1911’s power, accuracy, and durability and incorporated them into their 1911 airsoft pistol.

The TSD 1911 has many of the features of a real Colt 1911, including a beaver-tail grip, block iron sights, and the caliber engraved on where the shells eject on a real 1911. It’s also made of mostly of metal, with the exceptions of the grips and the orange tip. Although it does have a hammer, it isn’t a working one; it is locked into place and is solely for decoration.

Since the TSD 1911 is CO2 (a version of Green Gas) powered, you can fire it as fast as you can pull the trigger. There’s no need to cock the slide back every time you shoot, like you do with spring pistols. This makes giving covering fire in a airsoft battle very easy. But, you run out of ammo quickly, so it might be a good idea to invest in extra magazines.

The magazines them selves hold 15 rounds and are fairly easy to reload. They’re made of some type of metal and are very durable. They’re skinny though, because it has to squeeze in next to the CO2.  To reload you have to pull the magazine spring down to the bottom where it locks into place, then you just push the BBs into a hole near the bottom, just like every other airsoft pistol.

The TSD 1911 takes 12 gram CO2 cartridges that go into a chamber that is located right behind the magazine, at the very back of the grip. To take the CO2 cartridges in and out the grip slides backward so that you can access it from the side.

Shooting wise, the TSD 1911 is very accurate with .20 gram BBs. The front sight has a white dot on it so you can aim much more accurately. However, it has a extremely heavy trigger pull, so it’s a good thing if you have a steady hand. You also start losing strength and accuracy when the CO2 cartridge gets low, but that’s to be expected.

It’s non-blowback which means that the slide doesn’t slide back when you shoot. This is both good and bad, because on the one hand blow-back looks awesome and makes it much more realistic, but on the other, blow-back is a CO2 drainer and you’d run out of CO2 in half the time that you normally would. You only get to shoot six or seven full magazines before your CO2 starts running out, anyway, so it’s probably better that it doesn’t have blow-back.

The last thing that you should take note of is the velocity that it shoots. With a new CO2 cartridge the TSD 1911 fires .20 gram BBs at a mind-blowing 400 FPS. Because of this, it might be to hot for friendly backyard airsoft skirmishes. If you wear heavy jackets or airsoft protection gear, you’ll probably be okay, but you just don’t want to be wearing a simple t-shirt or to get hit in the bare skin.

To wrap things up, TSD 1911 is a great sidearm that packs a hard punch. It’s very accurate and holds its own against heavy enemy fire. It also makes a great target shooting pistol. Just get ready to burn through some CO2!

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 400 (with .20 gram BBs)
Accuracy: Spectacular
Power: CO2
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: TSD Sports

Video Review:

Galaxy G1 Airsoft Gun Review

The G1 by Galaxy is modeled after the Colt 25. It’s tiny build makes it ideal for being used as a pocket pistol or in CQB.

The first thing you’ll notice about the G1 is its size. It measures roughly 5-1/2 inches long and 3-3/4 inches high! This makes it perfect to slip into your pocket. Some people use it as a third gun (if you get captured in a airsoft battle and are forced to give up your primary and secondary, you can hide the G1 in your pocket and when your captors have their backs turned you can whip this out and try to make an escape). The G1’s size also makes it ideal for CQB (Close Quarter Battle) and maneuvering around corners and obstacles.

The G1 is probably best used as a “third gun” or a back up to your secondary because of its small, inaccurate design. It can shoot accurately at short ranges (15-20ft), but is inaccurate at anything more. Using .20 gram BBs will make it much more accurate, but it still is unpredictable at ranges over 30ft.

It shoots 240 FPS, which, for a pistol of this size, is pretty decent.

A down side is that it has no safety. This means, for safety reasons, you shouldn’t keep a round in the chamber until the moment you’re ready to shoot. The down side is, since you don’t already have a round in the chamber, you have to cock it back first. It takes about 3 seconds to cock the slide and get your sights on target, which is plenty of time for an enemy airsofter to see you and shoot you.

The magazine on the G1 only holds 8 rounds and finding spare mags are nearly impossible. But, again, the main purpose of the G1 is to fall back on and give you the chance to try to make a escape when your primary/secondary has been captured, ran out of ammo, or malfunctioned.

The sights are pretty bad, but like I said above, it should mainly only be used to buy time in a airsoft battle.

Though, the G1 is made almost entirely of metal (technically it’s called “Zinc Alloy”, but it feels a lot like metal) with the exceptions of the magazine and grips. This gives the gun a really good feel and makes it exceptionally durable.

The last thing that is worth noting is the workings. When you pull the slide back and let it slide back forward, sometimes a BB will get stuck in between the chamber and magazine and won’t allow the slide back forward again. You must then remove the magazine and cock it back a few more times to clear it. This is a big hassle to do when the whole point of the pistol is to buy time.

To wrap thing up, the Galaxy G1 is a okay little pistol, the main attraction being that it’s so small. I recommend that it only be used as a fall back in a airsoft war when your other two guns fail. As for target shooting, it’s a fun gun to shoot, but just know that you won’t be hitting the target a lot of the time. But, if you want a tiny little gun that has relatively good FPS and feels nice and solid, this might be the one for you.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 240
Accuracy: Good enough to buy some time
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 8 BBs
Manufacture: Galaxy

Stinger P9T Airsoft Gun Review

The Stinger P9T is a updated version of Crosman’s legendary Stinger P9. Updates include a updated safety, a larger profile, and a larger 15 round magazine.

One of the bigger updates was to the magazine. The Stinger P9T can hold 15 rounds, oppose to the Stinger P9’s 12. But a huge downside it that it no longer has a reservoir. This is a big deal if you plan to use it in airsoft fights. Also, the magazine’s bigger than the old one, so you can’t even use old P9 magazines.

The safety is located very close to the back of the gun so that it’s hard to reach. You have to pretty much hold the gun with your weak hand and then flip the safety forwards or backwards with your strong hand to effectively work it. I don’t know why Crosman decided to do that; probably so that kids with small hands can operate it better. It’s also reversed, meaning that forward is safety and back is fire. This is a design flaw because when you shove it into a holster, sometimes the holster catches it and it switches it to fire.

The old Stinger P9 was known for it’s smooth slide and easy trigger pull, but the Stinger P9T just isn’t the same. When you pull the slide back to cock it it feels like you’re grinding metal on metal. Also, the slide only pulls back about a inch, making it feel like you didn’t cock it all the way. The trigger pull is not for the weak, either. You have to really squeeze it to make it fire. This heavy trigger pull really slows you down when you’re trying to put some plastic down range.

One thing that didn’t change is the stunning accuracy. With .25 gram BBs you can hit a 12 inch gel target from well over 40 feet away. If the Stinger P9 and the Stinger P9T went head-to-head, I’d actually have to say that the Stinger P9T is a little bit more accurate.

Another good thing about the Stinger P9T is that it has a lot more metal than the old Stinger P9. The trigger is metal, along with several internal pieces that are visible with the clear plastic colored models.

With most of the Stinger P9T’s you get a holster included. But the holster is terrible. The old holsters that came with the Stinger P9’s had a Velcro strap on the back so that you could easily take it on and off. It also had a snap thing that you could take the strap that secures your gun into the holster off with, and you could also undo a clip and get the strap off that way. These new holsters just have a loop on the back to put your belt through, meaning you have to undo your whole belt to get it on and off. Also the only thing that keeps the gun securing strap in place is a narrow strip of Velcro.

The last thing that you’ll notice about the Stinger P9T is it’s weight. It is really heavy; unloaded it weighs close to 1-1/2 pounds! This is good and bad. On the one hand it feels very realistic and solid, but on the other it might start to wear on you after a hour or two of shooting.

Through all the down sides, the Stinger P9T can be a good side arm. In my mind, it doesn’t quite stack up to the Stinger P9, although the accuracy is actually a little better. If you make sure to use .25 gram BBs, buy a better holster, and possibly buy some extra magazines, it could make a pretty good spring pistol.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 275
Accuracy: Great
Power: Spring (you must pull back the slide before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .25 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Crosman

Video Review:

Beretta 90two Airsoft Gun Review

The 90two airsoft pistol by Beretta is a look-a-like of the Beretta M9. It boasts 260FPS and a 15-round magazine, which is great, whether you’re target shooting or using it in airsoft battles.

The Beretta 90two is almost entirely plastic, with the exceptions of the barrel and a few internal pieces. Although, it feels pretty solid and can withstand a couple drops.

The workings are okay for the most part. The slide is a little sticky, though. And what I mean by that is that when you cock it, it doesn’t make a satisfying click like most airsoft pistols do when you cock it back. So you don’t know if you got a BB in the chamber or not. Also, the magazine release is slow. When you hit the button to release the magazine, you have to shake the gun up and down to get it to fall out. The hammer is also hit or miss. When you pull the hammer back manually, you have to pull the trigger 2-5 times to get it to snap back into place; it just makes the whole gun feel kind of unresponsive. Although, when you pull the whole slide back and that pushes the hammer down, when you fire it usually snaps into place the first time. The safety is even hard to switch; it’s so hard to switch, you may even need to use a butter knife to switch it between safe and fire a couple times to get it loosened up.

The really big issue with the Beretta 90two is the magazine. It’s holds 15 rounds which is great, but it’s prone to breaking. It’s extremely poorly designed. The bottom of the magazine sometimes slides forward when you slam the magazine into the gun, or in the heat of battle it sometimes slides forward too. The problem with this is that the bottom is the only thing holding the little spring that pushes the BBs up into the chamber in place. When the bottom slides out of place the magazine spring flies out, along with your BBs. The simple solution to this is to glue/tape the bottom of the magazine to the actual magazine so it won’t slide forward.

Also, if you’re planning to carry the 90two in a holster, just know that it’s pretty hard to draw. The problem is that the front sight gets caught on the holster, so you have to pinch the holster with one hand and pull the gun out with your other to efficiently draw it. This isn’t a huge issue, just don’t be expecting to whip it out and start shooting.

Some of the good things about the Beretta 90two is it’s accuracy and the price. The 90two features upgraded white dot sights, which helps tremendously for aiming. The relativity high FPS (for a spring pistol) of 260, combined with the upgraded sights makes for very accurate shooting at 20-40ft with .20 gram. .12 gram BBs fly farther, but are way less accurate, so I’d stick to .20 gram. And for only $15-$20 that the 90two goes for, it’s a pretty good gun.

To wrap things up, the Beretta 90two isn’t too bad a gun for $15 or $20; just remember that you get what you pay for. The 90two would do pretty well to someone that’s looking to target shoot, but may not match up to some of the other airsoft pistols in a skirmish. In the end, it’s a good sidearm for a novice to mid-level airsoft player on a tight budget; just know how to deal with some of the problems that come with a cheap airsoft gun.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 260
Accuracy: Accurate at 20-40ft
Power: Spring (you must cock it back before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 15 BBs
Manufacture: Beretta

Crosman Auto-Reset Airsoft Target

Simple enough; if you hit one of the targets it goes down. Then you hit the target on the very left and they all pop back up. Unfortunately it’s never that simple.

For starters the Crosman Auto-Reset target’s a pain to put together. You have to pull the mesh netting over some metal bars and hook it over the plastic frame. But, since the netting is so tight, the metal bars want to fold inward. Even when you successfully get it all put together,  the netting still fights the bars and you have to prompt the bars back outwards every couple minuets. Also, the little stand that the actual targets are on snaps to the inside of the plastic frame, but it keeps wanting to pop out and mess the whole thing up.

After you finally get the Crosman Auto-Reset target all put together it still has problems. For one, the targets are extremely small. So unless you’re shooting it from under 20 feet, it’s near impossible to hit. And even when you do hit, unless you hit one of the targets dead center, it most likely won’t go down.

The target is also supposed to stop the BB and catch it in the net so you can reuse it. That’s also not true. The net is so tight that the BB hits the net and bounces right back out. So basically don’t be expecting for it to contain your BBs.

To pile more negative feedback on top, it breaks. If you miss the target and hit the plastic frame it’ll chip off. Even with low FPS (Feet Per Second) guns it still chipped the plastic if it hit it.

The Crosman Auto-Reset target isn’t all bad, though. You really can’t beat the price at the $10-$15 it goes for. Plus, when you actually do knock a target down, the reset works perfectly. If you want a cheap target that you can just fool around with on a rainy day, or even if you have a accurate rifle that you want to shoot at close range, this could fit the bill.

So, in closing, the Auto-Reset airsoft target from Crosman is far from perfect. But you have to remember that it’s only $10 or so.  If you’re looking to save ammo by reusing caught BBs, then stay away from this target, but if you just want a cheap alternative to a paper target I wouldn’t write this one off.

Crosman Gel Trap Airsoft Target Review

Depending on what type of airsoft gun you have, you go through a lot of BBs. The Crosman Gel Trap not only stops the BBs and is a great target, it catches them and drops them into a tray for you to reuse.

As far as the look of it goes, it’s much like a dartboard. This is useful because
you can also play two-player games, in addition to just trying to hit the bulls-eye.

The Crosman Gel Trap is about 12in wide and has a clip on the backside, so that you can hang it on a wall. You can also set it up on a table by lifting the target up from the tray, and inserting the legs of the target back into a slot in the middle of the tray. But, because the target is on the smaller side, it fills up fast, then you have to manually clear the target because it takes to long for all the BBs to fall into the tray.

It’s very durable, too. I’ve had mine for two years, and besides it getting a little less tacky and it chipping in a couple places, it’s held up very well. Although, getting grass stuck on the face of it is a fast way to ruin it. Also, the plastic around the gel part and the tray itself can get hit and chipped by higher FPS (Feet Per Second) guns; but that’s to be expected from any target.

Crosman claims that BBs hit the target and slowly drip down into the tray. For the most part this is true, although depending on the FPS of your gun, the BBs hit, stay for a few minuets, then suddenly drop into the tray. Either way, this target can save you thousands of BBs, and lots of money.

In a wrap, for the $9-$15 the Crosman Gel Trap costs, it’s well worth the money. I don’t really recommend anything over 300 FPS shoot this target, though, because they can damage the plastic on the target. Also know that this target is meant for airsoft guns, BB guns will damage the target.

Stinger P311 Airsoft Gun Review

The Stinger P311 airsoft gun is a look-alike of the famous Colt 1911; from the block iron sights, to the simple look of the gun. At only $10-$20 (depending on where you buy it), this pistol also packs a punch.

One of the cool features of the Stinger P311 is the hammer. Most airsoft guns don’t have hammers, but lately Crosman (the maker of this gun) has been incorporating them into their pistols, adding to the realism. When you pull the slide back the hammer gets cocked back also, just like a real gun. You can manually pull back the hammer, too, and it’ll just snap back in place when you pull the trigger; although it won’t fire if you do that, since you have to pull the slide back to get it loaded. So, really, the whole point of the hammer is just decoration.

This pistol also packs a punch, for what it’s worth. It shoots 325 FPS, which is just about as high as it goes with spring pistols (without modifying it, that is).

A problem, though, with the Stinger P311 is the hop-up is nonadjustable, which means you’re stuck with however tight it was wound in the factory. Basically, at ranges over 30 feet, the Stinger P311 tends to shoot straight for about 20 feet, then take a dramatic turn either go left/right/up/down. You can’t really count this as a “con”, though, because almost every pistol is going to have the same problem, more or less. A solution to this problem is to shoot .20 gram BBs; they’re heavier than the regular .12 gram, so they tend to curve less. In really bad cases of curving BBs, you could even use .25 gram.

Another flaw is that it’s big, which would be a problem if you wanted to stick it in your pocket or something. But, this is another non issue, because you can get a holster for under $10. Besides, in the world of spring pistols, in order to have high FPS, it has to be a big gun.

For it’s price, the Stinger P311 has very nice workings. The slide pulls back quickly and cleanly, which results in shorter time between shots. The magazine also ejects out very quickly. With some airsoft pistols you have to push the magazine release while shaking the gun to get the magazine to fall out. The Stinger P311’s magazine springs out, which also makes for quick reload times. The flaws in the magazine are that is has no reserve, which means you might want to buy extra clips, due to not being able to refill from the magazine itself. Also, if you can’t do tactical reloads, because (if you take out the magazine while it still has BBs left in it) a couple BBs will fall out, all over the ground.

And, another part to think about is the safety. It’s located on the left side, just above the grip. It’s shaped like a triangle, and it pivots on one of the points. You flip it up and down to turn on and off the safety. Because of its weird design, not many people are used to it, so it doesn’t feel natural to turn off/on the safety. Some people like the design, and some people hate it, it’s up to your personal preference.

To conclude, the Stinger P311 is a great sidearm for both target shooting and airsoft matches. It boasts a high FPS, but is best used at ranges under 30-40 feet. Also, think about buying a holster and some heavier ammo along with this gun. Factoring in the price, performance, and overall utility of the Stinger P311, it’s one of my favorite spring pistols to use.

Specs:
Feet Per Second: 325
Accuracy: Very accurate at 10-30 feet
Power: Spring (you must cock it back before each shot)
Caliber: 6mm
Recommended BB Weight: .20 grams
Magazine Capacity: 12 BBs
Manufacture: Crosman

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