Gen X Global Stealth Paintball/Airsoft Mask Review

The Gen X Global Stealth mask is great for both paintball and airsoft, giving your face protection from BBs and paintballs. It’s made mostly from durable, flexible plastic with the exception of foam around the inside of the lenses and the adjustable strap in the back.

The Gen X Global Stealth mask has a great fit. As mentioned before, there’s a adjustable strap on the back of the mask that you can easily pull tighter or looser. And the plastic that the mask is made of is flexible; this doesn’t only cushion the shock from BBs and paintballs, but it also flexes to the contours of your head, making for a nice and snug fit. There’s also a small line of foam padding outlining the inside of the lenses, boosting the comfort level tremendously. The foam also doesn’t scratch against your skin like other masks with inner foam lining, which can be extremely uncomfortable, especially so when you start to sweat.

As you can see in the picture above, the Stealth mask also has plenty of little slots for air to get through. This is a big up-side for airsoft/paintball skirmishes when you’re constantly on the move and needing to suck down a lot of air.

The visor that comes with the Stealth mask is removable. This is great for transitioning between sunny outdoor shooting and indoor or CQB where you have to be as low-profile as possible. However, it is a little tricky to get on and off. There’s two little rods (one on either side) of the visor that you must fit into two holes on either side of the mask. There’s also four little hook-type parts that you have to align into vents in the top of the mask. To snap the mask back on you must align all four hooks and both rods into their places which is easier said than done.

A huge down-side is that it’s almost impossible to shoot rifles with the mask on. The problem is that that mask interferes with aiming down the sight, basically forcing you to either hip-fire or hold the rifle way out in front of you with the butt on your chest while trying to line up the sights. Although, you’re going to have this problem with just about any mask and you can still use pistols effectively. This problem also only applies to airsoft rifles, since you don’t have to use the traditional aiming method with paintball guns.

Another down-side is that the mask doesn’t cover your entire head. With the exception of your ears, the side and back of your head are still completely exposed. However, you’re still going to have this issue with any other mask because the only thing that covers your entire head are helmets, which can often cost upwards of $100.

The durability of the Stealth mask is exceptional. Even when shot from ten feet away with a 325FPS airsoft pistol it doesn’t chip or break, even if shot in the lens and slots. And even if a BB or paintball managed to chip or crack the lens, it’s easily replaceable. The lens can come on and off by pressing a couple points.

Fogging doesn’t seem to be a major issue with the Gen X Global Stealth mask. From time to time you may have a little bit of fogging up, mostly if it’s cold out, but for the most part the lens stays clear.

In a wrap, for the 10-$20 the Gen X Global Stealth runs, it’s a solid mask. I wouldn’t recommend this to airsoft players, just because the major issue of not being able to look down the sights on rifles, but if you’re planning to use it for paintball or if you’re going to use a pistol you should be fine.

UTG Blister Airsoft Speedloader Review

Airsoft speedloaders reduce reloading time by pushing multiple BBs into the magazine with a single press of a button.

Operating the UTG Blister speedloader is pretty simple: First you fill the speedloader up with BBs. You then place the small cylinder shaped piece, located at the bottom of the speedloader, into where you’d normally insert the BBs into your airsoft rifle magazine. From there, you press a circular button, located near the top of the speedloader, which releases the long plastic piece that you can see coming out of the top of the loader in the picture above. Finally, you simply push the long arm piece downwards, and it will push BBs into the magazine.

The Blister speedloader holds about 115 BBs and ejects 4 BBs with every push of the arm. It actually does reduce reloading time quite substantially, oppose to manually reloading one BB at a time by hand.

It’s made entirely of plastic, but can withstand drops on soft surfaces.

The Blister speedloader comes with pistol magazine adapter. It’s just a small plastic piece that snaps onto the end of the speedloader and helps the speedloader stay flush against bulky spring pistol magazines while you pump BBs into it.

In a wrap, the UTG Blister speedloader is a vital piece of equipment for the 3-$5 it costs, especially if you play actual airsoft skirmishes. It cuts down loading time and keeps you in the game.

Umarex Tactical Force Combat CO2 Airsoft Gun Review

The Umarex Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back) airsoft pistol. It’s mostly made of metal, with the exception of the grip, and in many ways resembles a Glock. It requires standard 12 gram CO2 cartridges to operate.

The Tactical Force Combat is a GBB (Gas Blow-Back), as mentioned before, meaning that the slide jolts backwards every time you pull the trigger, just like a real gun. However, the Combat’s slide only blows-back about 3/4 of an inch, making it look and feel less realistic. It’s also a little clunky, meaning that the slide doesn’t blow back in a single, smooth motion; it’s almost feels like the slide is shuttering back and forth. This not only makes the gun feel sluggish, it makes more difficult to keep your sights on target when you’re shooting.

GBB’s are known for their ability to “shoot as fast as you can pull the trigger”, but the Tactical Force Combat can easily malfunction when being shot too fast. Often times it will dry fire and then fire two BBs on your next shot if you shoot too rapidly. This isn’t a huge deal, it just forces you to slow down and take your time, which is usually a good thing anyway. However, it’s still a hassle for the times that it’s necessary to put BBs down range at a fast pace.

The Combat also isn’t one of the more accurate pistols out there. At 15-20ft with .20 gram BBs it can hit a 12-inch Gel Trap with decent consistency. However, at ranges over 25 feet, the BB starts to sink and is very inaccurate.

The sights are both good and bad. The front sight consists of a little white rod stuck through a standard black blade front sight, giving you a sort of white-dot sight. The back sights are made of a little bent green rod that is also stuck through a standard back sight, giving you a sort of green-dot sight. The contrast of green on white dots makes aiming and acquiring targets easy and fast. However, if you looked at the sights from the side, the green and white rods stick all the way through the standard sights, popping out the other side, making them look sloppy. But this is only a cosmetic issue, and doesn’t effect performance.

The Combat boosts a impressive 400FPS (Feet Per Second) with .12 gram BBs, and averages between 350 and 380FPS with .20 gram BBs, depending on how new the CO2 cartridge is. Although .12 gram BBs have higher velocity, I’d recommend only using .20 gram BBs because they’re much more accurate.

Through all the downsides, the Combat gets extremely good shots-per-CO2. The blow-back starts wearing down after about 8-10 magazines and the slide stops being blown back far enough for the slide lock to catch, but it still shoots BBs consistently up until 14-16 magazines. This is great if you’re planning on using it in a airsoft war, minimizing downtime.

To put the CO2 cartridge into the gun you simply press a button on the bottom of the gun, directly behind the magazine, which releases the part of the grip, revealing a small compartment. From there, you fit the cartridge into the compartment and screw it in.

The magazine is just like any other GBB magazine. There’s a little metal lever on the side of the magazine that you pull down to the bottom and lock in place. Once locked in place, you pour BBs into a small hole near the bottom of the magazine and then unlock the metal piece, putting tension on the BBs. The magazine holds 15 rounds and is full metal, making it both durable and relatively high-capacity.

One of the more notable issues it the safety. Instead of simply sliding the switch back and forth, in order switch between “fire” and “safe” you must push the switch inwards and then back/forward. It’s very difficult to do this with one finger, forcing you to hold the gun in one hand while trying to manipulate the safety with the other. However, after switching between fire and safe multiple times, it starts to loosen up.

The last thing worth noting is some of the little details. On the trigger itself there’s a mock safety, it looks like a smaller trigger coming out of the normal trigger, which on a real gun you press down along with the trigger to fire; although it doesn’t do anything on this gun, and is just for show. Another cool feature is the slide lock. As soon as you’ve discharged the last round, the slide stays back, indicating you’ve run out of ammo.

In a wrap, the Tactical Force Combat pistol has a lot of issues, but also has potential. It’s great for CQB, but fails to stay consistent at long ranges. It also has a large magazine, and features very good shots-per-cartridge. The blow-back is a neat feature, but ultimately reduces accuracy. It’s really not a bad gun, but just not one of the best.

How to Make a Airsoft Masterkey

Masterkeys are basically miniature shotguns that can be attached onto tactical rails on a rifle. They’re great for CQB (Close Quarter Battle) because they have a wide spray radius and can take down multiple targets at a time. However, airsoft masterkeys are expensive and usually require Green-Gas to operate. In this post you’ll learn how to make a effective airsoft masterkey that operates without gas that’s made from inexpensive, household items.

This is what you’ll need:

  • An airsoft rifle that has tactical rails, preferably with holes lining the hand-guard. For example, the Crosman Stinger R34 is a perfect gun to use.
  • A toilet paper roll
  • Spray paint (I’d recommend using a standard color [black, OD green, etc.] for tactical reasons, but you can use a more creative color if you want to be unique)
  • Bright orange duct-tape
  • A sturdy balloon (try to keep it the same color as the spray paint you’re using)
  • A flat piece of wood, about as long and a little bit skinnier than the toilet paper roll (the wood from a mousetrap is perfect)
  • 3 zip-ties
  • A red-dot sight (this is completely optional, but it just helps aiming a little bit. Plus the red-dot sight only applies if you decide to mount it on the side instead of the bottom [I'll explain mounting options later on]. However, if you do want the red-dot sight also get a fourth zip-tie)
  • Heavy duty tape (duct-tape will do)

Step 1: Cut the neck off your balloon so that there’s a wide opening. Don’t cut it too far down, but just down of where the narrow neck begins to widen. You can discard of the cut-off neck.

Step 2: Now take your toilet paper roll and fit the balloon over one end of it. Only have about an inch of the balloon actually over the toilet paper roll, the rest of it should just be hanging off the end. Once you have gotten the balloon about 1 inch over the toilet paper roll you can then tape it down with the heavy-duty/duct-tape. Make sure to tape it down firmly and to wrap it in several layers of tape to insure that it won’t come undone.

Step 3: Take the small piece of wood and tape it onto the toilet paper roll. But, only tape it down on either end, leaving the middle open so that you’ll be able to sqeeze the zip-ties in between the wood and the toilet paper roll later on. Make sure to tape it down tight enough so that the wood and toilet paper roll won’t become separated, but not so tight that you crush the toilet paper roll and that you’ll have enough leeway to sneak the zip-ties in-between. In the side-image below I taped the wood down with black tape so that you can see where you’re suppose to put it.

Step 4: Now you can spray paint the entire thing (try not to spray paint the balloon because it won’t be as stretchable). After the paint’s dried, take the orange duct-tape and wrap it all the way around the very front of the toilet paper roll (the opposite end of where the balloon is). The orange duct-tape will serve as the orange safety tip; It’s illegal to have a device that fires projectiles (besides real ammunition and metal BBs, that is) without a orange tip on the muzzle at least 3/4 of an inch thick. If you decide not to put the orange tape on the muzzle of your masterkey, then you run the risk of people thinking it’s a real firearm and can even get you in trouble with the police.

Step 5: Now take the zip-ties and squeeze them in between the piece of wood and the toilet paper roll. Since it’s made of cardboard, the toilet paper roll should bend inwards a little bit when you push the zip-ties though, giving you enough room to sneak them through. If you’re having a hard time, loosen the tape that’s holding it down. Make sure to space the three zip-ties at small intervals (one on near the end of the masterkey, one in the middle and one near the front). Don’t pull the zip-ties completely though. Pull/push them through just enough so that you have slack to go around the piece of wood, through one of the holes in the gun, out another hole in the gun, and back to the end of the zip-tie where you can pull it tight.

If you’re confused on what you’re suppose to be doing with the zip-tie then think of it this way: You’re basically tying the piece of wood to the gun, securing the masterkey. In the illustration below, the black part represents the zip-tie, the blue part is the hand-guard of the gun, the red parts are the holes on the hand-guard that the zip-tie goes through, the green part is the piece of wood, and finally the purple part is the actual masterkey which is obviously attached to the piece of wood:

So all you’re doing is completing that black loop with zip-ties in three different places.

If you’ve done it correctly, then it should look something like this:

As you can see, the black zip-ties go in-between the piece of wood, through a hole on the top of the hand-guard, out a hole in the bottom of the hand-guard, and finally connects back up with the other end of the zip-tie. You can then pull the zip-tie tight and cut off the excess.

It’s recommended that you mount the masterkey on the side of the gun instead of on the bottom rail; Mounting on the side allows you to pull the balloon back further when you’re firing, creating higher velocities, and it also allows you the option of attaching a sight onto it, if you’d like. The only downside is that it’s higher profile mounted on the side, and can sometimes bump into things and break.

How the masterkey works is, when you’re ready to fire, to pour 5-10 BBs directly in to the muzzle of the masterkey and let them trickle into the balloon. You then grasp the BBs from the outside of the balloon, holding them firmly in-between the balloon so that they wont fall back out the muzzle. You then  pull the balloon backwards and let it go to fire. The balloon will launch the BBs forward at about 200 FPS and has a effective range of 10-15ft.

And it’s very simple to attach a red-dot scope onto the masterkey if you want to. All you do is run a fourth zip-tie between the wood and the toilet paper roll (just like you did to mount it), except instead of going into the gun you run it over a red-dot sight and then tighten it down, keeping the sight firmly in place. The sight honestly doesn’t help too much, but it at least gives you a general idea of where you’re shooting at and it also has to “cool” factor.

Please give all credit from this project to SirBuffaloSushi and Airsofter United.

DBoys M4/M16 Airsoft 500rd Extended Magazine Review

The DBoys 500-round Extended Magazine fits onto most M4 and M16 airsoft AEGs. It’s an upgrade from the average 300-round magazines that come with the average M4/M16 AEG, giving you a 66% (or 200 BB) increase in BB capacity.

The DBoys Extended Magazine works just like any other AEG magazine. You load the BBs into a little plastic sliding door on the top of the magazine, filling up a large chamber. You then slide the little door shut and insert the magazine into your gun. From there you wind a wheel on the bottom of magazine (you can see the wheel in the picture above, at the bottom of the magazine, in the bottom right corner) until it gets hard to turn and starts to make a distinct clicking noise.

Having 500 rounds is great because you can just keep shooting without having to reload. However, about half way through the magazine, BBs will stop feeding and your gun will start to dry-fire. When this happens you need to wind the wheel on the bottom back up again. It’s not a huge deal, but it can be a chore if you’re in a actual airsoft skirmish and you have to stop to wind your magazine back up, especially when the whole point of a extended mag is to not have to stop to reload.

The DBoys Extended Magazine also claims to work with M4s and M16s from JG, AGM, DBoys, Classic Army and Echo 1, but that’s not entirely true. With my personal JG M4 2010 Upgraded Version I have to wiggle the magazine back and forth to get it to slide into my receiver and then forcefully slam the bottom of the magazine with the palm of my hand to get it to click into place (kind of like what your avatar does on Call of Duty: Black Ops when you close the top of the M60 after reloading it). The problem is that the magazine doesn’t go with the slight turn that M4 receivers have, making the back of the magazine scrape up against the M4′s receiver. Although slamming the bottom of the magazine does make it click into place and allows it to work normally, it makes reloading much slower and also causes some cosmetic damage to the magazine as well as inside receiver.

The magazine is very durable, however. It’s made completely of metal, excluding the wheel on the bottom, the plastic door on the top and a couple other little pieces. Even after upwards of 20 times of slamming it into my M4 it still works fine.

The last thing worth noting is that the little plastic sliding door that keeps the BBs from falling out of the storage chamber is very loose. This means that if you tip the magazine forward, unless it’s already inserted into your gun, the door will slide open, letting BBs fall all over the ground. Therefore, keeping spare magazines outside the gun (in a vest, backpack, etc.) is not a good idea without taping over the door first. However, this isn’t a huge problem because, being an already extended magazine, you may not need a spare.

In a wrap, the DBoys Extended Magazine is great for extended shooting. Even though you have to stop about half way through the magazine to re-wind it, it still beats having to carry a whole other magazine with you. And also just keep in mind that you might have to put some effort into getting the magazine into your gun.

Also note that this attachment is for AEGs (Automatic Electric Guns) only. It won’t work with spring rifles.

Tapco Intrafuse T6 Rubber Butt-Pad Review

The Tapco T6 Butt-Pad attaches to the butt of most M4s with adjustable stocks, compatible with both airsoft rifles and real ones.

The T6 Butt-Pad pops right onto most M4 style rifles with adjustable/collapsible stocks without any glue, tape, or any other bonding agent. It also pops right back off very easily if you pull on it, but it’s still snug enough that it won’t fall off in the middle of shooting. To give you an example of what type of stock works best, the T6 fits perfectly onto my personal JG M4 2010 Upgraded Version as well as the Crosman Stinger R34 airsoft rifles.

The T6 definitely helps the butt of your gun to stay up on your shoulder, especially if you’re wearing a backpack or a vest where there’s a strap right where the stock rests. It also takes off some of the impact that your shoulder gets from recoil on real guns.

The T6 also adds a full inch the the length of your gun, which can be both good and bad. If you have longer arms, you might benefit from the extra length. But if you already have your stock at a perfect length, the extension might make your rifle feel awkward. Although, truthfully, an extra inch doesn’t make that big of a difference on my personal airsoft rifles, and, besides, the T6 only fits onto adjustable stocks like I’ve mentioned, so you should be able to just adjust your stock an inch inward if you really don’t like the extra length.

It’s also extremely durable. It’s made fully of rubber, and can hold up to just about any climate or terrain you can throw at it.

In a wrap, the Tapco T6 Butt-Pad is a durable and cheap attachment for any M4. It works with both airsoft and real firearms and keeps your rifle up on your shoulder. The only down-side is the extra length, which isn’t even that big of a deal.

BattleAxe M4/M16 Dual Magazine Airsoft Connector Review

The BattleAxe Dual Magazine Connector is designed to fit almost any M4 or M16 airsoft magazine, making reloading times faster and helping to conserve space.

Each of the BattleAxe Connectors (each pack comes with two of them, as you can see in the picture above) is made up of 4 pieces: a large plastic buckle in the front, a smaller plastic piece in the back, a long screw that connects the two plastic pieces and also runs in between the two magazines, and finally the olive-drab strip of fabric that holds the magazines in place.

The whole connector is cheaply made, but in particular the olive-drab straps are very thin and the ends fray very easily. Right out of the package all four of the ends weren’t properly tied, and were starting to fray. A simple solution here is to, as soon as you get the connector, take a couple pieces of duct-tape and sandwich about 1 inch of the end of the strap between it. This will help keep it from fraying and make it a little more durable.

How the connector works is each of the magazines go in between the screw that runs down the middle and the olive-drab strap on either side. You then pull the strap tight and tighten the screw in the back to give it added stability. However, some M4 and M16 magazines might be too wide to fit in between the plastic piece in the front and the plastic piece in the back. In most cases you can just loosen the screw until the two plastic pieces are far enough away from each other for the magazine to fit in between. But, in other cases, you might need to purchase a longer screw.

The last issue worth noting is that the magazines do start to slide up/down after extended use, but this is something you just have to live with because all magazine connectors are going to have the same problem, more or less.

Through all the down-sides, the BattleAxe magazine connector isn’t all bad. The reloading time is just about the same with AEGs because you still have to wind up the magazine, you can’t just pop it in and start shooting. But, it works very well for spring guns that magazines you don’t have to wind up. And it’s also great for saving space, keeping the extra magazine on the gun itself instead of having to keep it on you body.

Although, BattleAxe says that their magazine connector is just as good as any metal magazine connector, which I can’t say is true because you don’t have fraying/durability problems with the metal connectors as much as you do with this fabric and plastic one.

In closing, the BattleAxe M4/M16 Dual Magazine Airsoft Connector isn’t all bad. It certainly has some quality issues, but it’s cheaper and lighter than the metal connectors. And as long as you don’t expect too much, the BattleAxe magazine connector might be all you need.

Also note that it does not come with the two magazines. Unless whoever you’re buying from specifically says otherwise, all you get are the two connectors; you need your own two magazines to use in partnership with the connectors.

Rothco Outdoorsman Rucksack Review

The Rothco Outdoorsman Rucksack is a somewhat basic rucksack with multiple pockets, padded adjustable shoulder straps and a waist-strap for added support.

The Outdoorsman Rucksack is made almost completely of thin canvas material, with the exception of the straps and plastic buckles, which makes it light, but also a little less durable. It’s not delicate by any means, you can load quite a bit of weight into it without it faltering (I loaded my personal one up with 20lbs. worth of airsoft equipment and it didn’t seem to have any problems). Although, there’s a draw string underneath the flap at the top of the rucksack that you pull to close up the main compartment, and if you pull it to hard, it will start tearing into the fabric and cause it to fray.

The Outdoorsman Rucksack has 4 compartments: a main one which basically makes up the whole rucksack, two smaller side pockets on either side, and one pocket right on the front of the rucksack. Unless you’re carrying a single, large item, the big main pocket is kind of a waste. Because the main compartment is literally just a big empty pocket, with no kind of sorting or smaller compartments inside it. So if you want to put a bunch of smaller things in there (duct-tape, airsoft BBs, books, food, whatever), they get all mixed up and smashed. A solution to this is to get a bunch of smaller bags/backpacks  and place the smaller items in them, then put the bags into the big compartment. And the other 3 pockets aren’t even that big, nor do they have any type of sub-pockets, either.

Another thing to note is that rucksacks and backpacks are different. A backpack holds its shape and stays high up on your back, they also have a bunch of smaller pockets to store little items in. But a rucksack, like the Outdoorsman, is more or less a fabric bag that has no shape and hangs low on your back unless you put a large object into it to give it some shape. That’s why rucksacks are meant for holding bigger items like sleeping bags or wood (that’s why the Outdoorsman has that big unorganized compartment that I mentioned). Rucksacks aren’t bad, they’re just meant for different purposes then backpacks. So, if you’re thinking about buying the Outdoorsman Rucksack, just make sure you actually do want a rucksack and not a backpack.

Although, the large amount that the Outdoorsman Rucksack provides does come in handy. To give you an idea how much just the one big compartment will hold, deflated, the Intex Explorer 200 Inflatable Boat will fit with plenty of room to spare. Plus, you can stash another few small items in the other 3 pockets.

All in all, the Outdoorsman is a fairly good rucksack. As long as you’re sure you want a rucksack, it’s durable and can hold a load of weight. The waist-strap and adjustable shoulder straps also let it fit very well. For the price of $15-$25, you really can’t go wrong.

Intex Explorer 200 Inflatable Boat Review

The Intex Explorer 200 is a multipurpose inflatable boat that can be used from playing around at a pool to coordinating a water attack in airsoft. In addition to the boat, an air pump, two oars, a repair patch, and a small piece of rope are included.

The Explorer 200 is made up of two air chambers; one is the actual boat, and the other is the floor. This just means that instead of inflating the whole big thing, you inflate the two chambers separately. It also means that if one of the chambers popped while you were on the water, the other staying inflated should give you enough time to make it back to land before you sink.

For a $15 inflatable boat, the Explorer 200 is pretty rugged. I wouldn’t suggest putting it in the ocean or down whitewater rapids, but it can easily stay afloat in a lake or river, even in rough conditions. Even hitting submerged stumps or grinding it into land doesn’t seem to damage the hull beyond some cosmetic streaks. Although, frequently running into rocks will tear a hole in the boat very quickly.

The hull itself is very thin (barley thicker than a few pieces of paper), making it fairly light weight to carry on land, but like I said, with the exception of rocks, it can withstand just about anything.

The air pump that comes with the Explorer 200 is actually really good. It’s a “Double Quick” pump, which means that it pumps air both when you push the pump and handle towards each other and away from each other, cutting the time to fill the raft in half (it still takes a good 10-15 minuets of constant pumping to get both air chambers fully inflated, though). The pump is made up of two parts also; the pump itself and a rubber hose that you attach to the end of the pump. The pump is about a foot long and is made of plastic, but is still very durable.

The Explorer 200 is a perfect choice for those that where thinking of using it in airsoft. You can use it for a variety of things including transporting gear across water, attacking a enemy players base camp from the water, and much more. It has a 210 pound weight limit and is only barley big enough for one person, so you should be careful not to overload it, although I’m confident that you could have upwards of 215 pounds in the boat at once and be okay. Also, the Explorer 200 can operate in less than a foot of water without getting run aground, which is great if you need to get close to shore or over a sand bar. In case you are under attack, any BBs that hit the boat under 350 FPS should just bounce right off; although anything over 350 FPS might be getting a little close to penetrating the boat.

The boat does come with a repair patch, but it’s only about 2 inches long and 2 inches wide, making it ineffective in patching bigger holes. It you do suffer a major gash to the boat, try pasting superglue all around the hole and then stick several overlapping layers of duct-tape over it.

The only weak link is the oars. They’re made up of five parts each; two rods, a paddle, a connecter to connect the two rods, and a rubber circle that you slide onto the end of one of the poles to keep the whole ore from falling through the oarlock that’s fixed to the actual boat. All the parts just screw together and are 48 inches in length. The part that’s the “weak link” is the connecter (no pun intended :)). If you paddle to hard then it will simply snap apart. A easy fix to this is to wrap the connecter in a duct-tape several times, just to give it some reinforcement.

The last thing worth noting is the actual performance of the Explorer 200. If you paddle fast enough you can get some real speed (between 5-10 MPH, and in some cases more). It also has very nice handling, easily twisting between stumps and rocks. The only thing is that you have to sit backwards in the boat, so you have to twist around to see where you’re going.

In a wrap, the Intex Explorer 200 inflatable boat is a really great product for the $15-$20 that it runs. It’s easy to inflate, hard to sink, and has great handling. It’s relatively small, but it gets the job done.

UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip

The UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is one of the more basic grips out there, although it’s sturdy and gets the job done.

One of the biggest issues you might have is mounting it. It’s designed for Picatinny rails, which are smaller than the Weaver rails that are more commonly used in airsoft. The sides which grip the rail are also fixed, so you can’t make them any larger. But, if you push hard enough, you should be able to slide it on after a little trial and error. Once you get it on you simply tighten the big knob on the bottom to keep the grip from sliding backwards and forwards.

A cool thing about the UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is that it’s ambidextrous. This means that it can be used for both right and left handed shooters.

There’s also two little plastic pieces on either side of the grip that are removable to make room for a pressure pad (flashlights, lasers, etc). To remove them, you just twist off the knob that keeps the grip from sliding backwards/forwards and they will just slide right off. And, like I said, there’s a piece on either side so that you can put the pressure pad on either side, depending on which hand you shoot with.

Another nice feature is the hidden compartment. The knob that keeps the grip in place/takes the plastic pieces off and on is really hollowed out. And there’s a little cap on the end of the knob that you can screw off to reveal the compartment. It’s mostly meant for carrying spare batteries, but you can carry anything from a folded up piece of paper to extra BBs very easily.

As far as sturdiness, the Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is very sturdy. It has no wobble at all and doesn’t budge even if you accidentally hit it against something while shooting in CQB. It’s even more sturdy if you did mount it on a Weaver rail because it fit so tight to begin with. You can even use it as a bi-pod if you’re lying down.

Using the grip does wear on you after a while. While it does make your gun more stable and therefore more accurate, it’s difficult to hold your arm out at length, with the weight of the gun on you, without wearing yourself out very quickly. Try holding your hand almost all the way out in a fist; you’ll start to feel uncomfort in under three minuets. Now try holding your hand closer to your body, right in front of wear the magazine would be, with you palm comfortably pointing upwards; you should be able to hold that stance for longer.

Although, you’re going to have that problem with any grip. Plus, the adrenalin from being in a airsoft fight (or real gun fight, if that’s what you’re planning on using it for) will give you a boost so that you won’t even feel it.

In a wrap, the UTG Model 15 Tactical Foregrip is a very sturdy, basic grip, but gets the job done. It has a couple cool features, and is also cheap for what it’s worth. Overall, I think this is a great investment for any kind of rifle, airsoft and real.